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Thread: Tourniquets and quick clot 2019

  1. #61
    Quote Originally Posted by ST911 View Post
    Just broke a TMT. SAM XT is unsat. Others on that list are less than ideal.

    Hopefully CoTCCC "recommended" won't come to have the same value of NTOA "member tested & recommended."

    The only TQs I will bet my life on are a SOFTT-W variant and the CAT gen7.
    Which part of the TMT broke? I'm curious to know where the weak point is. Thanks.
    Last edited by Tackleberry40sw; 05-29-2019 at 06:58 AM.

  2. #62
    Moderator BehindBlueI's's Avatar
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    Thread bump, anything new for 2020/2021?

    https://centrifugetraining.com/produ...al-tourniquet/

    Thoughts on this? I saw it while perusing the site due to it being mentioned in a different thread.
    Important rule change regarding political discussion here: https://pistol-forum.com/showthread....58#post1151858

    Quote Originally Posted by UNM1136 View Post
    Maybe with talented students I would lube up with baby oil and then go at it.

  3. #63
    Quote Originally Posted by BehindBlueI's View Post
    Thread bump, anything new for 2020/2021?

    https://centrifugetraining.com/produ...al-tourniquet/

    Thoughts on this? I saw it while perusing the site due to it being mentioned in a different thread.
    Those are now CoTCCC approved. I have (or, had) a couple that I've since misplaced - suspect my sister stole them when I last visited.

    They seem fine, my totally evidence free hesitation is that they may not provide true circumferential pressure if they are applied to a thin/distal extremity (ie. thin adults or children). That said they are also the only company I've seen that makes a pediatric specific TQ which you can get on their site, and you can have similar issues with the traditional windlass based TQs too. I played around with them a bit pre-pandemic when I last had them. Hopefully they turn up again at some point. Application did seem easier one hand from my recollection and on a thigh or similar they'e a cinch (pun intended) to apply.

    I feel like I read or spidey sensed from somewhere that they maybe are more durable and stand up to repeat application vs CAT-Ts but that is just a whisper from some dusty little corner of my brain so take that for what it's worth (not much)

    edit: I've also used these never for real world application so again grain of salt. IIRC the last time they came up, too, this article re: the use of adult TQs on pediatric patients was posted suggesting that they are still useful in kids. I just noticed in self applying on my ankle/wrist that the windlass on my CAT-T was harder to secure and there was a lot of extra nylon that made it feel not quite as confidence inspiring as when it was applied elsewhere. I'll go grab my trainer and play around with this now, actually.
    Last edited by Nephrology; 01-10-2021 at 07:20 PM.

  4. #64
    Quote Originally Posted by Nephrology View Post
    Those are now CoTCCC approved. I have (or, had) a couple that I've since misplaced - suspect my sister stole them when I last visited.

    They seem fine, my totally evidence free hesitation is that they may not provide true circumferential pressure if they are applied to a thin/distal extremity (ie. thin adults or children). That said they are also the only company I've seen that makes a pediatric specific TQ which you can get on their site, and you can have similar issues with the traditional windlass based TQs too.

    edit: I've also used these never for real world application so again grain of salt. IIRC the last time they came up, too, this article re: the use of adult TQs on pediatric patients was posted suggesting that they are still useful in kids. I just noticed in self applying on my ankle/wrist that the windlass on my CAT-T was harder to secure and there was a lot of extra nylon that made it feel not quite as confidence inspiring as when it was applied elsewhere. I'll go grab my trainer and play around with this now, actually.
    Well, my brain must have bubbles in it or something. I was wrong. The CAT-T is easy to securely apply to my ankles/wrists with appropriate lose of pulses.. It may be that I am remembering an issue that I had with the RMT and not the CAT-T. If I recall correctly, because they use that strip of plastic ratcheting teeth along the length of the nylon, they can't apply truly circumferential pressure around narrower anatomy as a windlass-based design as the plastic has a limited ability to flex.

    Of course I clearly mis-remembered this experiment of mine just a few minutes ago so I may be wrong a second time. Unfortunately I don't have the RMTs around to test this again.

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