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Thread: In the United States, we have a severe under-incarceration problem

  1. #41
    Quote Originally Posted by RevolverRob View Post
    The problem with Illinois is definitely under-incarceration. Under-incarceration of criminal politicians and their cronies.
    And there you have it. The reason for Chicago's appalling murder rate is Chicago's political system, which makes going after gangs and putting murderers in jail . . . ah . . . shall we say problematic. Not a lot has changed since the days when Al Capone owned the town.

    And the reason that Illinois, and Chicago and the Chicago schools are all going rapidly broke is that those same Crook County politicians control all three.

    And nothing will change until they do run out of money since a system in which the dead still get to vote is not easy to change. After all, the prosecutors who should be looking at why dead people are voting were elected by those same dead people.

  2. #42
    Site Supporter $teve's Avatar
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    Nothing more troubling then seeing a violent incarcerated person being released from prison and back into society only to victimize other innocent people. As for sex-offenders the State I worked the prison system with started an excellent program it was called "Civil Commitment/Confinement" if a group of Behavioral Specialists believed the individual would offend again, they would be committed to a mental health institute once completing their criminal sentence. The courts have to realize some people need to stay incarcerated period.

  3. #43
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    Quote Originally Posted by $teve View Post
    Nothing more troubling then seeing a violent incarcerated person being released from prison and back into society only to victimize other innocent people. As for sex-offenders the State I worked the prison system with started an excellent program it was called "Civil Commitment/Confinement" if a group of Behavioral Specialists believed the individual would offend again, they would be committed to a mental health institute once completing their criminal sentence. The courts have to realize some people need to stay incarcerated period.
    I did not realize that there were that many "mental health institutions" still open. I know in GA, they closed many (most?) of the mental health facilities.

  4. #44
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    Quote Originally Posted by ranger View Post
    I did not realize that there were that many "mental health institutions" still open. I know in GA, they closed many (most?) of the mental health facilities.
    I think that's true for most places, but for instance in NJ there's still 3 state-run psych hospitals. In VA I think there's at least twice that.

    The issue isn't that we closed the psych hospitals and have no place to put people...….the issue is we thought it was a good idea to drug and release people, and closed hospitals because of that. We can always make more space if we decide to put more people in them.

    We just need to get over the idea that incarceration is cruel and end "catch-and-release" polices on the immigration, criminal, and psych. Civilization requires boundaries. Imagine if we took all the money that we spend on frivolous programs and instead pumped it into essential services......
    "Are you ready? Okay. Let's roll."- Last words of Todd Beamer

  5. #45
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    I have long thought that we not only have an under -incarceration problem of violent criminals but the real deficiency is not enough violent offenders are shot during the act. I remember applauding a local prosecutor who was vilified for telling the newspaper that is a good thing if a burglar is shot every once in awhile.

  6. #46
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    Quote Originally Posted by Poconnor View Post
    I have long thought that we not only have an under -incarceration problem of violent criminals but the real deficiency is not enough violent offenders are shot during the act. I remember applauding a local prosecutor who was vilified for telling the newspaper that is a good thing if a burglar is shot every once in awhile.
    Geez, could you imagine the teeth gnashing if cops still etched notches into their sidearm for every bad guy?
    "Are you ready? Okay. Let's roll."- Last words of Todd Beamer

  7. #47
    Murder Machine, Harmless Fuzzball TCinVA's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Poconnor View Post
    the real deficiency is not enough violent offenders are shot during the act. I remember applauding a local prosecutor who was vilified for telling the newspaper that is a good thing if a burglar is shot every once in awhile.
    There are actually people out there who have sat straight faced and argued that shooting a criminal denies them due process.
    3/15/2016

  8. #48
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    if They think that is a violation of due process; their heads would explode if I told them “Inshallah” or said a 15 pellet jury of federal #1 buckshot found them guilty

  9. #49
    FNFSFFW RevolverRob's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by TCinVA View Post
    There are actually people out there who have sat straight faced and argued that shooting a criminal denies them due process.
    Wait, getting shot by cops or by private citizens denies due process?

    Because by definition, getting shot by one of those two groups could not deny anyone due process, because private citizens have no responsibility to provide due process.

    I've seen people argue that throwing someone off your front porch, because you don't like them, is a violation of their civil rights. After I calmly explained to this person, that you don't have civil rights on my front porch, because it's private property, I thought their head would explode. "No! Everyone has all their rights all the time, everywhere!" - Some people need about six or eight remedial civics classes.
    "P-f: I lurked for wonderful combat pistolcraft advice, but I ponied up cash for my daily dose of Dada." - Baldanders

  10. #50
    Murder Machine, Harmless Fuzzball TCinVA's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by RevolverRob View Post
    Wait, getting shot by cops or by private citizens denies due process?

    Because by definition, getting shot by one of those two groups could not deny anyone due process, because private citizens have no responsibility to provide due process.
    Private citizens.


    Some people need about six or eight remedial civics classes.
    ...or to be situated so they have the exclusive pleasure of interacting with the criminals they insist must be loosed on society.
    3/15/2016

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