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Thread: Arresting sight (dot) movement at the end of the draw stroke.

  1. #1
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    Arresting sight (dot) movement at the end of the draw stroke.

    Understanding that the dot will never be motionless, is there a drill or technique that will mitigate movement at the end of the press out?

    Thanks, David

  2. #2
    Site Supporter taadski's Avatar
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    Smooth deceleration?

    I'd answer you question with a question though. Since we're talking about a 'press out', is the disturbance you're seeing from reaching the end of the extension of the gun? Or is it movement that's a function of a lack of appropriate trigger control? I'd think about separating the two, answering those questions, fixing the issue(s), then proceeding to putting them back together.

  3. #3
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    Quote Originally Posted by taadski View Post
    Smooth deceleration?

    I'd answer you question with a question though. Since we're talking about a 'press out', is the disturbance you're seeing from reaching the end of the extension of the gun? Or is it movement that's a function of a lack of appropriate trigger control? I'd think about separating the two, answering those questions, fixing the issue(s), then proceeding to putting them back together.
    It's at the end of extension. I'm sure that as you mentioned, a "smooth deceleration" is the answer but I'm wondering if there is a method or drill to help with that. Or, is it only a conscience thought process of smooth deceleration during dry fire practice that will accomplish this. I hope this makes sense, I don't convey things very well sometimes.

  4. #4
    Site Supporter Clusterfrack's Avatar
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    Arresting sight (dot) movement at the end of the draw stroke.

    Dryfire: Stand right up to a target or a wall. Draw your gun and touch the muzzle to the target. Don’t worry about trigger or sights. The gun shouldn’t hit the target. Touch it.

    Just put the gun on a spot on the target. Focus on relaxation. Next, add a timer.

    You should start to feel how tension is your enemy. Relaxation will produce the fastest times.

    Now you can step back and confirm your technique with sights.

    Repeat.
    Last edited by Clusterfrack; 10-04-2018 at 01:25 PM.
    "BJJ is sort of like nonconsensual yoga"
    "You don’t really graduate from certain problems or certain things… like you always have to work on trigger control and pulling the trigger straight. " --Ben Stoeger 1/24/2018

  5. #5
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    Quote Originally Posted by Clusterfrack View Post
    Dryfire: Stand right up to a target or a wall. Draw your gun and touch the muzzle to the target. Don’t worry about trigger or sights. The gun shouldn’t hit the target. Touch it.

    Just put the gun on a spot on the target. Focus on relaxation. Next, add a timer.

    You should start to feel how tension is your enemy. Relaxation will produce the fastest times.

    Now you can step back and confirm your technique with sights.

    Repeat.
    Thanks!

  6. #6
    Hammertime
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    Quote Originally Posted by Clusterfrack View Post
    Dryfire: Stand right up to a target or a wall. Draw your gun and touch the muzzle to the target. Don’t worry about trigger or sights. The gun shouldn’t hit the target. Touch it.

    Just put the gun on a spot on the target. Focus on relaxation. Next, add a timer.

    You should start to feel how tension is your enemy. Relaxation will produce the fastest times.

    Now you can step back and confirm your technique with sights.

    Repeat.
    Cool drill. Great tip.

  7. #7
    Ron Avery in his videos mentions that your press out needs to be contrlled, like you are going to use your muzzle to press a doorbell. This is a little counterintuitive, as many of us train to get the gun out like our life depends on it. Throwing the gun out like that causes it to bounce around when it comes to a sudden stop.

    pat

  8. #8
    Site Supporter Clusterfrack's Avatar
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    I like that doorbell analogy.

    Also, it may be time to retire the term “press out” from our vocabulary because it implies a straight line trajectory of the sights toward the target. I don’t do that, and many (most?) top shooters don’t either.
    "BJJ is sort of like nonconsensual yoga"
    "You don’t really graduate from certain problems or certain things… like you always have to work on trigger control and pulling the trigger straight. " --Ben Stoeger 1/24/2018

  9. #9
    Member John Hearne's Avatar
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    I used to get a full firing grip at position 3 - where my hands merge. I've found that if I fully establish by support hand grip at the end of extension, it seems to dramatically reduce the "earthquake" at the end of the pressout.
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  10. #10
    After a suggestion by Ernest Langdon two or three years ago, I added a compressed deceleration at the end of a direct presention draw, and it is consistently faster and more accurate. Rob Leatham teaches the same concept doing (horizontal) transitions.
    Likes pretty much everything in every caliber.

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