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Thread: How to demo advantages of gripping the carbine forearm vs mag well

  1. #1
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    How to demo advantages of gripping the carbine forearm vs mag well

    I would like to hear some ways of demonstrating the advantages of gripping the carbine forearm vs the old mag well hold. I have some folks who aren't convinced...I suspect the real reason is that it is easier to move around with it in low ready by holding the mag well.

    How have you guys addressed this issue?

  2. #2
    Quote Originally Posted by Redhat View Post
    I would like to hear some ways of demonstrating the advantages of gripping the carbine forearm vs the old mag well hold. I have some folks who aren't convinced...I suspect the real reason is that it is easier to move around with it in low ready by holding the mag well.

    How have you guys addressed this issue?
    Brian Nelson describes controlling the carbine being a function of, and in this order — stance, grip, muzzle device, then lightened bolt/ammo, etc. Grabbing the carbine at the mag well reduces leverage and seriously compromises the recoil control you strive for with grip.
    Likes pretty much everything in every caliber.

  3. #3
    Easily Distracted LOKNLOD's Avatar
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    I like the "you don't write with a pencil held by the eraser, do you?" tactic.

    Two variations:

    1.) Classroom version
    Stand in front of a blank cardboard target, sheet of paper, whatever.
    Get a Sharpie.
    Take the cap off, and put it on the opposite end.
    Ask someone to write their name one the target.
    Make them do it only holding it by the cap, at the far end.
    Laugh at poor penmanship.
    Hold it correctly (closer to the tip).
    See improvement.
    (hopefully) observe lightbulb moments.

    2.) Range version:
    Same thing, but tape the sharpie to the muzzle of a (cleared and verified, or disabled outright) rifle.
    Have them draw a smiley face holding the rifle by the magwell.
    Have them draw a smiley face holding the rifle far out on the forearm.
    Which one works out better?
    --Josh
    When I draw, I don't deactivate the safety; I activate the danger.

  4. #4
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    Quote Originally Posted by LOKNLOD View Post
    I like the "you don't write with a pencil held by the eraser, do you?" tactic.

    Two variations:

    1.) Classroom version
    Stand in front of a blank cardboard target, sheet of paper, whatever.
    Get a Sharpie.
    Take the cap off, and put it on the opposite end.
    Ask someone to write their name one the target.
    Make them do it only holding it by the cap, at the far end.
    Laugh at poor penmanship.
    Hold it correctly (closer to the tip).
    See improvement.
    (hopefully) observe lightbulb moments.

    2.) Range version:
    Same thing, but tape the sharpie to the muzzle of a (cleared and verified, or disabled outright) rifle.
    Have them draw a smiley face holding the rifle by the magwell.
    Have them draw a smiley face holding the rifle far out on the forearm.
    Which one works out better?
    Now that is most excellent...thanks!

  5. #5
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    Ken Hacakthorn talks about it here on the MP 5 at about 23:45. Basically the mag well hold is problematic because the mage well is the pivot point of the gun.

    The mag well hold on ARs gained popularity among people using fixed stock 20” rifles in close quarters. They basically gave up some control in order to make the guns handle quicker in tight spaces. Like “short stocking” over the shoulder it’s is a niche technique.


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    Quote Originally Posted by HCM View Post
    Ken Hacakthorn talks about it here on the MP 5 at about 23:45. Basically the mag well hold is problematic because the mage well is the pivot point of the gun.

    The mag well hold on ARs gained popularity among people using fixed stock 20” rifles in close quarters. They basically gave up some control in order to make the guns handle quicker in tight spaces. Like “short stocking” over the shoulder it’s is a niche technique.

    Thanks...actually I was trained to "short stock" back in 1990 using the M16.

  7. #7
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    There's a safety issue here also. If you've ever seen an AR go high order with an overpressure round or bore obstruction, it blows apart in the ejection port and mag well area. You're literally "holding the grenade" if you mag well hold these guns. Just stop it....
    Regional Government Sales Manager for Aimpoint, Inc. USA
    Co-owner Hardwired Tactical Shooting (HiTS)

  8. #8
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    Quote Originally Posted by Wayne Dobbs View Post
    There's a safety issue here also. If you've ever seen an AR go high order with an overpressure round or bore obstruction, it blows apart in the ejection port and mag well area. You're literally "holding the grenade" if you mag well hold these guns. Just stop it....
    Good point...and unfortunately I have seen it on a M16A2. Luckily the shooter was not holding the mag well at the time.

  9. #9
    Site Supporter Clusterfrack's Avatar
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    Show them this video:
    https://youtu.be/O3CxkhMVva4
    "BJJ is sort of like nonconsensual yoga"
    "You don’t really graduate from certain problems or certain things… like you always have to work on trigger control and pulling the trigger straight. " --Ben Stoeger 1/24/2018

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