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Thread: Geco 158 grain truncated cone FP FMJ .38 & .357?

  1. #1

    Geco 158 grain truncated cone FP FMJ .38 & .357?

    Has anyone seen gel tests of the Geco 158 grain truncated cone FP FMJ .38 & .357 rounds?

    My understanding is that a truncated cone FP is a very different critter than a round nose projectile. More like a FP hardcast or the LSWC profile, which are well respected for their effectiveness in spite of not expanding.

    These rounds come up at reasonably affordable prices for rimmed cases, and Geco seems to make some reasonably high quality stuff.
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  2. #2
    I have not shot any, but I do know that S&B has a similar flat point FMJ load in .38 (and maybe .357 too), that is available for pretty cheap from places like SG Ammo or Target Sports. If you try either the Geco or S&B load, I'd like to hear your results.

    I too, think that a flat pointed projectile seems to "hit harder" and work a bit better than a round nose profile bullet. I don't have any scientific data to back that up, but personal experience over the years leads me to believe it. For defense use, I still prefer a JHP for my 442, and I use RA38B. When out in the sticks, where four legged threats are more likely, a heavy cast or FMJ load isn't a bad idea.

  3. #3
    I can't tell you about gel tests but I can tell you that the .38 stuff is very nice, very clean ammunition that tend to hit where it is aimed at with S&W revolvers. It's currently my favorite .38 FMJ (when priced decently) and I have little doubt that it would be effective with decent shot placement.

  4. #4
    Very Pro Dentist Chuck Haggard's Avatar
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    Penetration would be extreme.
    I am the owner of Agile/Training and Consulting
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  5. #5
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    Quote Originally Posted by Chuck Haggard View Post
    Penetration would be extreme.
    I agree. I've shot Geco's .357 Mag version in both handguns and in a Henry lever rifle. I would buy it again for plinking or for carrying afield when a hog or coyote might appear. I think it's good ammo but my opinion is subjective. The price is reasonable. I always associated Geco with Switzerland or Sweden but think that recently imported stock is Hungarian. I would avoid it for self defense use because of extreme penetration. There was a time when I would assert that flat point ammo is definitely more effective than other non expanding ammo, but now I would say that the advantage is theoretical. I will stick my neck out and add that unless its performance duplicates Doc's findings, then flat point ammo is in that big category of non expanding ammo that has limited effectiveness when fired at typical handgun velocities.
    Last edited by willie; 07-12-2018 at 12:00 AM.

  6. #6
    Quote Originally Posted by Chuck Haggard View Post
    Penetration would be extreme.
    My guess is that it would not penetrate much more than the old 130 gr. FMJ load that the USAF used to carry in their Model 15's or a 230 grain FMJ .45 round.

  7. #7
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    In .357 Mag the penetration would greatly surpass the AF .38 or .45 230 gr fmj projectiles. At close range all would pass through humans, though. When shooting military .45 ammo into plowed fields, I would notice that the projectiles could be recovered by raking through the dirt--not digging. Ditto for same fired into a dirt berm when shooting a Thompson. Soil was black prairie dirt.

  8. #8
    One of the nice things about hard cast swc or wnfp are that they tend to track straight. That has to do with the bullet profile and the hardness of the lead. Soft lead swc bullets will deform and swerve unpredictability. Like RNs.

    A jacketed fp is harder than a plain lead bullet but I doubt it's harder than a hard cast bullet.

    I do know American eagle 9mm 147 grain for will shoot through a 150lbs deer.

  9. #9
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    FMJ copper(not plated)is harder than hard cast lead. Hard cast penetrates better because the lead has less drag through other materials--lower friction coefficient. Also, with same bullet weight and powder charge, lead will give higher velocity because lead bullets offer less resistance going down the bore. All this said, I would not claim that penetration difference between the two types is significant unless the target is dangerous game. Then "everything" counts.

  10. #10
    Site Supporter 5pins's Avatar
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    In my test with the 10mm the 200gr FMJ-FP penetrated more than the 200gr or 230gr hardcast bullets. However when shot through sheet metal the FMJ deformed more and penetrated less then the 200gr hardcast.

    I would expect a 158gr FMJ in .357 mag to penetrate for days.

    https://pistol-forum.com/showthread....trator-10mm-45

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