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Thread: Geco 158 grain truncated cone FP FMJ .38 & .357?

  1. #21
    Member
    Join Date
    Jul 2017
    Location
    Texas
    I've never seen jacketed revolver bullets that did not have a crimp groove, but my statement does not imply that they don't exist. I do concede, though, that taper crimping revolver bullets has become an acceptable reloading practice even when roll crimping is omitted. My preference is using the Lee die that does both. And then there is a Lee collet die available for some calibers that will put the mother of all crimps on bullets by tightening a collet to exert tremendous force against the case mouth and bullet. Very high recoiling revolver rounds are one application for collet die crimping.

    Many years ago I would see pistol ammo like 9mm and .45 ACP that had a cannelure on the case directly behind where the projectile would be in the case. The cannelure served as an indentation to prevent bullet set back in the case. Often I have wondered why premium defense ammo does not include case cannelures. Cannelure tools are available for the experimentor.

  2. #22
    Member
    Join Date
    Oct 2011
    Location
    Asuncion, Paraguay
    Quote Originally Posted by willie View Post
    I've never seen jacketed revolver bullets that did not have a crimp groove, but my statement does not imply that they don't exist. I do concede, though, that taper crimping revolver bullets has become an acceptable reloading practice even when roll crimping is omitted. My preference is using the Lee die that does both. And then there is a Lee collet die available for some calibers that will put the mother of all crimps on bullets by tightening a collet to exert tremendous force against the case mouth and bullet. Very high recoiling revolver rounds are one application for collet die crimping.

    Many years ago I would see pistol ammo like 9mm and .45 ACP that had a cannelure on the case directly behind where the projectile would be in the case. The cannelure served as an indentation to prevent bullet set back in the case. Often I have wondered why premium defense ammo does not include case cannelures. Cannelure tools are available for the experimentor.
    I wonder this as well...

    Corbin makes a cannelure tool. A friend has one and we used it for hand made and factory jacketed bullets. Never used them for the case, to avoid set back.

    Oh, the good 'ol days when I had enough idle time to experiment... Three kids changed that

  3. #23
    Site Supporter LtDave's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2011
    Location
    Central AZ
    Case cannelure = extra step, more cost. Fiocchi still does it on their Italian made .380 ammo.
    The first indication a bad guy should have that I'm dangerous is when his
    disembodied soul is looking down at his own corpse wondering what happened.

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