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Thread: Eugene's 9mm learning

  1. #1

    Post Eugene's 9mm learning

    I'll give this a try, I split the list because I've tested a few different loads so I can some points will be repeated.

    • Reloading press used (list modifications if relevant): Lee Hand Press 2013-present, Lee Classic Turret 2015-present
    • Caliber: 9mm
    • Bullet (Weight, Coating, Profile, Manufacturer): 115 and 124 grain plated Berry’s
    • Powder manufacturer, type and charge; volume, type (ball, stick, flake): Various, more details below.
    • Dies used: Lee
    • Primers used: Winchester
    • Cartridge Overall Length (COAL): 1.15
    • Chronograph data (if possible):
    • Goals intended with this load: Shorter term goal is to make some lighter loads to learn with and then work up loads which are similar to SD for the most realistic training.


    Winter / early spring 2013 bought my first pistol There were already shortages and panic buying and high prices due to political and a previous mass shooting incident. I skipped the .22 for a first and bought a 9mm. Started saving brass with intent to learn to reload “someday” Ammo supply dried up due to panic buying, went from limited to 2 boxes per person to none found anywhere. As I would make trips to different stores I bought the Lee reloading book and a Cabelas tumbler. Bought 1000 brass from forum for $40 shipped, bought Lee hand press, 9mm dies. Started de-priming, cleaning, sorting. After many trips I eventually found primers, bullets, and finally 1lb of Titegroup powder as supplies started to become available.

    06/13/13 First loads 5 each of 3.8 and 3.9 Grains Titegroup and 115 grain Berry’s Plated Round Nose
    Since I was still new and shooting low and left (anticipating recoil) I was starting to load under the published starting in order to attempt to get softer recoil. 3.9 appears slightly more accurate though both and the factory ammo are still low/left so I can’t really say for sure its more accurate I loaded up a box of 50 for the next trip to the farm and copied some Lee and Hodgdon load data into a spreadsheet to keep on my phone so I could look for other powder that I had loads for.

    Summary for this time:
    • Powder manufacturer, type and charge; volume, type (ball, stick, flake): Hodgdon Titegroup 3.8grains
    • Bullet (Weight, Coating, Profile, Manufacturer): 115 grain Berry’s Plated Round Nose
    • Results - accuracy, smokiness, clean burning, flash, temperature, smell, brass deformation, etc.: As accurate as I am
    • Problems encountered and fixes applied: still a little too much kick for a newbie.
    • Anything of interest: Calculated cost at very close to 50% of similar factory ammo


    And the "Range"
    Last edited by Eugene; 07-09-2018 at 10:48 PM. Reason: Picture

  2. #2
    While the Titegroup didn’t meet my immediate goal of less recoil I did load a few more batches of 50 to continue practicing with. Near the end of 2013 I did find some longshot ans tested the following load:
    • Powder manufacturer, type and charge; volume, type (ball, stick, flake): Hodgdon Longshot 5.0grains
    • Bullet (Weight, Coating, Profile, Manufacturer): 115 grain Berry’s Plated Round Nose
    • Results - accuracy, smokiness, clean burning, flash, temperature, smell, brass deformation, etc.: About the same as Titegroup for accuracy, I’m probably the limiting factor here
    • Problems encountered and fixes applied: more kick than Titegroup
    • Anything of interest: Since this didn’t meet my initial goal I shelved the Longshot for now and didn’t do any further testing

  3. #3
    Member
    Join Date
    Jul 2017
    Location
    Texas
    Your stated goal is reduced recoil. Unless I'm misinformed on basics, I'm pointing out that bullet velocity and weight will determine recoil. Selecting the lowest weight charge to function the pistol should not be difficult. Pistols like Beretta 92s will have much less perceived recoil because of their weight. Also their heavier slides retard slide velocity. Smaller pistols like S&W Shields or Glock 43s will have much more felt recoil. To tame your pistol despite size, I have a trick. Buy a weighted wrist bracelet like joggers use and wear it on your gun hand when practicing.

    In your study consult a powder burn rate chart that will rank powders by burn rate. The chart will give insight. To achieve your goal, the faster burning powders are best choices within the range of those suited for reloading 9mm ammo. Note that many traditional pistol powders are also shotgun powders. Bullseye powder has been used for very many decades for loads such as those you are seeking. It's not better than others but is common and has much published data. Buy a couple manuals and follow them. Have fun. What pistol brand and model did you buy?

  4. #4
    My powder "choice" was limited to what was available locally at the time. I also slowed down some for a while as after 2013 was when my son started having issues which cut into range time.
    If I jump ahead to 2015 then I found a lb of Unique and worked up a soft load with it.
    So now we have
    • Powder manufacturer, type and charge; volume, type (ball, stick, flake): Alliant Unique 4.9g
    • Bullet (Weight, Coating, Profile, Manufacturer): 124 grain Berry’s Plated Round Nose
    • Results - accuracy, smokiness, clean burning, flash, temperature, smell, brass deformation, etc.: Decent accuracy, again, more accurate then I, reduced recoil
    • Problems encountered and fixes applied:
    • Anything of interest: I didn’t have any issues with unique so for the moment I’ve settled on it until I can get more regular range time in.

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