Page 2 of 2 FirstFirst 12
Results 11 to 20 of 20

Thread: Good way to mount an AR scope LOWER?

  1. #11
    From a pure technical shooting perspective, the lower and further inboard you can get the butt of the carbine, the better the recoil control. A taller mount allows you to get the butt lower and still have a decent head position.
    Likes pretty much everything in every caliber.

  2. #12
    Site Supporter
    Join Date
    Feb 2011
    Location
    Allen, TX
    Quote Originally Posted by texasaggie2005 View Post
    Forgive my ignorance, but wouldn't the barrel's profile (HBAR, med-con, LW, etc) affect the 1.98"?
    It's an M4 standard, so I guess that's possible.
    Regional Government Sales Manager for Aimpoint, Inc. USA
    Co-owner Hardwired Tactical Shooting (HiTS)

  3. #13
    Quote Originally Posted by GJM View Post
    From a pure technical shooting perspective, the lower and further inboard you can get the butt of the carbine, the better the recoil control. A taller mount allows you to get the butt lower and still have a decent head position.
    Do you think that a roughly 1/4 inch difference in scope height makes a big difference in that regard? Serious question. I'm certainly not very knowledgeable about running ARs at a high level, and am always eager to learn something new from somebody who is.

    I just can't imagine that a small for age 11 year old girl (my daughter) should optimally use the same comb height as a smaller than average guy with a thin face(me) who should also optimally use the same comb height that works best for the largest gorilla humans who use rifles anywhere on the planet. It can definitely be accomodated, and I'm sure there are trade offs, but I have a gut feeling that it's passing the point of diminishing returns. People have such different size/shape heads/faces. To me it seems like putting large backstraps on a Glock 21 and giving it to a kid.

    But I've been know to be wrong before. Alot.

    Edit to add: I'm probably using the term comb height incorrectly here. I mean distance from the top of the stock to the center of the optic. Adjusting the optic lower wouldn't change comb height, I guess. It's weird on an AR.
    Last edited by frozentundra; 06-13-2018 at 11:28 PM.

  4. #14
    Quote Originally Posted by frozentundra View Post
    Do you think that a roughly 1/4 inch difference in scope height makes a big difference in that regard? Serious question. I'm certainly not very knowledgeable about running ARs at a high level, and am always eager to learn something new from somebody who is.

    I just can't imagine that a small for age 11 year old girl (my daughter) should optimally use the same comb height as a smaller than average guy with a thin face(me) who should also optimally use the same comb height that works best for the largest gorilla humans who use rifles anywhere on the planet. It can definitely be accomodated, and I'm sure there are trade offs, but I have a gut feeling that it's passing the point of diminishing returns. People have such different size/shape heads/faces. To me it seems like putting large backstraps on a Glock 21 and giving it to a kid.

    But I've been know to be wrong before. Alot.

    Edit to add: I'm probably using the term comb height incorrectly here. I mean distance from the top of the stock to the center of the optic. Adjusting the optic lower wouldn't change comb height, I guess. It's weird on an AR.
    As described by Brian Nelson, lead instructor at TPC’s Carbine Mastery class, controlling the carbine is, in this order, stance, grip, the muzzle device, then operating components. The smaller you are, the more important leverage and aligning the skeleton becomes, so I would say getting the butt lower and inboard is especially important for her. What I don’t know is what optic she is using, and how that works for her. Probably less important with an Aimpoint and more important with a LPV.
    Likes pretty much everything in every caliber.

  5. #15
    Quote Originally Posted by GJM View Post
    As described by Brian Nelson, lead instructor at TPC’s Carbine Mastery class, controlling the carbine is, in this order, stance, grip, the muzzle device, then operating components. The smaller you are, the more important leverage and aligning the skeleton becomes, so I would say getting the butt lower and inboard is especially important for her. What I don’t know is what optic she is using, and how that works for her. Probably less important with an Aimpoint and more important with a LPV.
    Interesting way to codify that. Makes sense.

    This would be a LPV. The main application would be learning positional rifle shooting techniques and practical rifle marksmanship out to 300 yds.

    I must say, I'm a little confused about the relationship between what I perceive as modern 'gunfighting' centric carbine technique--which seem optimised for putting volume of fire on target, really FAST, at close to intermediate range-- and traditional positional marksmanship technique, such as might be taught at an Appleseed event, focusing primarily on precision at range. Or perhaps by Randy Cain or Gunsite as practical rifle courses. I wonder where/how the utility of one begins and the other ends? Or is there more of a hybridization that I don't understand the nuances of going on?

    I wish I had the resources and ability to travel around and take a bunch of serious rifle training, but I've prioritized pistol training to the relative exclusion of rifle training.

  6. #16
    Frozen tundra,

    What positions are you teaching your daughter to shoot from? There have been some recommendations on this thread, the Larue risr looks like a tool that could add value. Here are my lessons learned teaching kids to shoot. I have 3, current ages 10, 7 & 6. I'm a military dude, been through some great training including TPC Carbine w/ Brian Nelson that George references above.

    Lessons - started my oldest when he was 6 on an AR w/ a .22LR conversion kit and an older EOTECH. He still needed a "chin weld" even w/ the stock collapsed. Position standing or sitting, rested on bags.

    Age 8 a family friend gifted him a well used .22LR semi auto Savage (62?), full sized Rifle. Though he grew he still used a chin weld, rifle rested while standing. Struggling for body position.

    Age 9-10 Santa brought him a fixed 4x Leupold for his Semi auto Savage. Standing, rifle rested, chin weld he makes consistent hits on 2" steel at 45yds. With the Fullsize rifle he still struggles to shoot standing/freestyle.

    Observation - The gun he has the most fun shooting is his little brothers Savage single Shot "Rascal". He can shoot it from any position and it fits (fits all of the kids).

    If I could do it over again - I would start w/ a savage rascal w/ a good fiber optic front sight.

    Note - I think red dots or fiber optics make it a lot easier to teach younger kids. Sight alignment and sight picture can be a struggle w/ iron sights.

    The Savage rascal costs 150 - 200$ depending on stock material. Some of the scope mounts to fight for 1/4" can cost that much.

    Just my .02 cents.

    Jeremy

  7. #17
    Site Supporter
    Join Date
    Dec 2015
    Location
    Lowcountry, SC
    Quote Originally Posted by frozentundra View Post
    I must say, I'm a little confused about the relationship between what I perceive as modern 'gunfighting' centric carbine technique--which seem optimised for putting volume of fire on target, really FAST, at close to intermediate range-- and traditional positional marksmanship technique, such as might be taught at an Appleseed event, focusing primarily on precision at range. Or perhaps by Randy Cain or Gunsite as practical rifle courses. I wonder where/how the utility of one begins and the other ends? Or is there more of a hybridization that I don't understand the nuances of going on?
    This is a great question. I've been through Appleseed as well and I'm interested in opinions on how the traditional positional shooting taught there works with modern carbine technique. Subbed to hear thoughts on this one.

  8. #18
    Site Supporter Clusterfrack's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2013
    Location
    Redneck wonderland

    Good way to mount an AR scope LOWER?

    I took my 13 year old daughter to Appleseed, and it was a great experience for her. She shot a Sharpshooter score with a 10/22 and a 4x scope. The fundamentals she learned were excellent, but in my opinion, limiting and not in line with modern rifle and carbine technique.

    At the time, I was competing heavily in precision tactical and carbine, and found it pretty easy to shoot Expert (Rifleman) with a bolt action .22. My technique (especially with the sling) was not in line with Appleseed dogma, but the head instructor finally told everyone "Leave him alone. He knows what he's doing." I almost won another Rifleman patch with an AR and a red dot.

    A few thoughts:

    Cheekweld: super important if you are shooting a rifle with a high-power scope. You need to be able to line your face up so you can see through the scope. I also use my cheek to stabilize a heavy precision bolt gun when standing and kneeling. However, your head position is usually different when shooting prone, and you need to set up your rifle to work in all positions. I've never found a cheek-riser system that worked well on an AR, and frankly it's just not that important unless you've got big glass.

    Stock fit: super important, and much more so than cheek position. The stock needs to go in the pocket of your shoulder. Otherwise your POI will be inconsistent and followup shots will be slow.

    My daughter learned to shoot a bolt gun with a cheek riser. She also learned to shoot an AR set up in a standard configuration. It wasn't a big deal.




    Last edited by Clusterfrack; 06-14-2018 at 01:05 PM.
    "BJJ is sort of like nonconsensual yoga"
    "You don’t really graduate from certain problems or certain things… like you always have to work on trigger control and pulling the trigger straight. " --Ben Stoeger 1/24/2018

  9. #19
    Badger has an excellent unimount, comes in some lower heights.


    Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk

  10. #20
    Site Supporter NH Shooter's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2014
    Location
    New Hampshire, U.S.A.
    Quote Originally Posted by frozentundra View Post
    I'm thinking about a simple, lightweight BCM ELW-F upper with nothing else mounted on it. Just a lightweight LPV optic that's mounted lower to optimise cheek weld. And a sling.
    Mine is currently set up with just a set of DD irons. As an old High Power shooter, shooting targets with just irons is a lot of fun;




    I really like light weight when it comes to an AR. My BCM rifle is set up with the 16" mid-length ELW BFH upper and on a bench with bags, can shoot bug near-MOA at 50 yards.

    That said, there are significant advantages to using an optic. I have toyed with the idea of trying the following optic/mount combo which amazingly comes in under 10 ounces total;

    Leupold FX-II 2.5x20mm Ultra-Light Rifle Scope - 6.5 ounces

    Aero Precision Ultralight 30mm Scope Mount - 3.2 ounces

User Tag List

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •  

TLG 1970–2016 RIPRampageForTheCure.org