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Thread: Aimpoint just dropped ACRO P-1 MRDS!

  1. #1101
    Murder Machine, Harmless Fuzzball TCinVA's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Alpha Sierra View Post
    Not gonna read 111 pages.......

    So I take it this Aimpoint thing isn't the second coming of the reflex sight christ?
    It is an extremely durable optic that, of the available options, has the least fucks to give about environmental factors.

    It uses a battery that has about 1/5 of the power of a 2032 series battery so battery life on useful settings (seemingly for most people's eyes) is significantly shorter than on the RMR. Battery changes on the ACRO are extremely easy to perform and can easily be done preemptively on a schedule. You can even keep a spare battery in the back grip space on the Glock.

    The biggest day-to-day issue I deal with is adjusting the brightness setting for the conditions. In the day I keep it on 8 or 9 if I'm carrying it, or at max if I'm using it outdoors on the range. I dial it back to 6 at night because my go-to gun is a shotgun rather than the G17 the ACRO is mounted to.

    I prefer it to the RMR.

    But at this point in the game picking the right RDS for you is about picking the set of issues you want to deal with. The ACRO's battery life is pretty easy to deal with and the batteries to feed it even if you keep it dialed up really high is less than most people are paying for a yearly Netflix subscription.
    3/15/2016

  2. #1102
    Quote Originally Posted by TCinVA View Post

    But at this point in the game picking the right RDS for you is about picking the set of issues you want to deal with. The ACRO's battery life is pretty easy to deal with and the batteries to feed it even if you keep it dialed up really high is less than most people are paying for a yearly Netflix subscription.
    Agreed - all pistol RDSís have fleas of some kind. I just think itís pretty pathetic they still claim the battery life of 1.5 years when they have to know itís not even close to that. Itís not clever marketing. Itís an outright lie.

  3. #1103
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    Quote Originally Posted by voodoo_man View Post
    As far as duty grade pistol optics, it's the first coming.
    You should call USSOCOM, let them know their chosen pistol optic isn't "duty grade"
    Last edited by Alpha Sierra; 01-01-2020 at 04:46 PM.

  4. #1104
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    Quote Originally Posted by TCinVA View Post
    It is an extremely durable optic that, of the available options, has the least fucks to give about environmental factors.

    It uses a battery that has about 1/5 of the power of a 2032 series battery so battery life on useful settings (seemingly for most people's eyes) is significantly shorter than on the RMR. Battery changes on the ACRO are extremely easy to perform and can easily be done preemptively on a schedule. You can even keep a spare battery in the back grip space on the Glock.

    The biggest day-to-day issue I deal with is adjusting the brightness setting for the conditions. In the day I keep it on 8 or 9 if I'm carrying it, or at max if I'm using it outdoors on the range. I dial it back to 6 at night because my go-to gun is a shotgun rather than the G17 the ACRO is mounted to.

    I prefer it to the RMR.

    But at this point in the game picking the right RDS for you is about picking the set of issues you want to deal with. The ACRO's battery life is pretty easy to deal with and the batteries to feed it even if you keep it dialed up really high is less than most people are paying for a yearly Netflix subscription.
    Thanks Tim. Appreciate the summary.

    Other than the fact that the emitter is fully protected (which can be a big deal depending on the user) why else do you prefer it over the RMR?

    I had the chance to dry fire a friends Shadow 2 with an SRO and I was impressed with how big and clear the window is. I assume Trijicon reliability goes along with it. I was also happy to see that I had zero issues making the dot appear right in the center of the window presenting freestyle from low and compressed ready. SHO and WHO......LOL need to work on those.

    I'm looking at taking the pistol optics plunge this year, first for sports, then depending on how that goes, maybe for real.
    Last edited by Alpha Sierra; 01-01-2020 at 05:34 PM.

  5. #1105
    Murder Machine, Harmless Fuzzball TCinVA's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Alpha Sierra View Post
    Other than the fact that the emitter is fully protected (which can be a big deal depending on the user) why else do you prefer it over the RMR?
    It uses clear glass so there's no tint when looking through it. (Another key to the RMR's battery life...the tint means less energy output for a visible dot) It has less distortion towards the edge of the glass than the RMR as well.

    Mainly I prefer the ACRO because of its durability and imperviousness to the environment. Some have said that the "tube" construction of the ACRO makes it easier to find the dot, but I'm not seeing that.

    The ACRO's window is a bit taller and narrower than the RMR's meaning it is more forgiving of a presentation that gets elevation wrong than one that gets windage wrong. In other words, easier to find the dot with a vertical mistake than with a horizontal mistake. RMR is the opposite. I find that most of my presentation errors are the result of steering the gun due to inconsistent application of grip pressure which usually manifests as a horizontal mistake.

    I had the chance to dry fire a friends Shadow 2 with an SRO and I was impressed with how big and clear the window is. I assume Trijicon reliability goes along with it.
    Kinda. The ability to replace the battery without removing the optic is a big bonus of the SRO, in my opinion, but my beef with it is that that big beautiful window it has which gives you a lot more room to find the dot comes at the price of a much more fragile arrangement for the glass.

    Ordinarily you'd think that isn't a huge deal for a concealed carry guy, but early last month I sprained my ankle in the middle of working on a movement drill and ate shit on a gravel range. When I realized I was falling with a loaded handgun in my hand I did what I'd practiced and jettisoned the pistol resulting in it smashing optic first into the gravel and traveling a couple of feet digging into said gravel.

    For the ACRO that resulted in some scratches on the exterior aluminum body of the optic but no damage to visibility through it or to the function of it. I'm not so sure the SRO would have survived that.

    I know I can count on the ACRO working or at least not impeding my ability to see through it short of something incredibly unusual happening. A buddy of mine shot a match at the end of November and was engaging strong hand only from the holster on a stage. He has a habit of exhaling to force himself to slow down and concentrate...and that exhalation of air was enough to fog up the window of his RMR enough to where he couldn't see the sights, and enough to fog up the emitter lens enough that he didn't get a dot.

    I'm looking at taking the pistol optics plunge this year, first for sports, then depending on how that goes, maybe for real.
    I haven't found that the dot itself has improved my shooting much outside doing the things we do least with a pistol...namely shooting really accurately at distance. At that the dot is peerless. I've killed 4 squirrels with my ACRO equipped G17 and with each shot I've hit the vitals of a squirrel at distances ranging from a spine shot at just under 25 to hitting through the rib cage at over 65. On that 65 yard shot I was thinking "there's no way I'm going to hit..." and then the gun went off and I saw the squirrel disappear. It's tail stuck straight up, tremored, and then dropped out of sight. Sure enough, I'd nailed it right through the vitals. I certainly couldn't consistently make those kind of shots at that kind of distance with irons.

    What it has done, and this is where I think the majority of people see benefit from the RDS on the slide, is been a coach sitting on top of the gun.

    To borrow a phrase from my buddy Ashton, the sights whisper to you but the dot yells at you. You can see mistakes you are making more easily with the dot on top of the gun and correct them more readily.

    It also helps reduce the tendency to over-confirm sights. Once you start to relate what you are seeing with the dot to what you are seeing through the sights to what the irons look like it starts to remove that lag time of "Are my sights good enough?". The other day I was doing work at 25 yards nailing a 6" Red Stitch hostage plate in under 1.5 seconds from the draw with the dot turned off. Some of that is because I've worked on improving my draw speed, but a good bit of it was seeing a good enough sight picture and just pressing the trigger on it.

    For max carryover benefit to defensive use of your pistol, I'd suggest keeping your dot gun close to your carry gun so the lessons translate most easily. Assuming, of course, you won't be carrying the dot gun.

    Caveat there with the SRO would be that due to its bigger window I'm not sure if it would help correct errors on presentation as much as the RMR or the ACRO with their smaller useful FOV.
    Last edited by TCinVA; 01-02-2020 at 12:20 PM.
    3/15/2016

  6. #1106
    I know some folks have complained about the battery caps being kinda finicky to take off, due to the softness of the aluminum. Something I found out recently was that the Aimpoint Micro tool's elevation/windage adjustment part (the two little plastic nubs) fits beautifully in the screwdriver slots, and since it's plastic, doesn't gouge the metal.
    Last edited by Default.mp3; 01-05-2020 at 10:21 PM.

  7. #1107
    Quote Originally Posted by Alpha Sierra View Post
    I'm looking at taking the pistol optics plunge this year, first for sports, then depending on how that goes, maybe for real.
    Some food for thought about using a dot "for real:"

    I had the opportunity to take Tactical Scenarios, a force-on-force scenario/decisionmaking class from Karl Rehn, late last year. At various points I had my gun on people and at various points I shot people. I had my dot every time -- there was no "you won't see your sights in a gunfight," it was just superimposed on my target. On the one occasion I engaged in sighted fire with an iron sight gun, I presented, fired a few shots, and realized I should probably get on the iron sights if I wanted to hit anybody.

    Apart from the above, obviously, 25 yard shooting is far easier. For me, I'm at my iron sight speed (a deliberate 0.30s split time for almost everything) for most things, and recently did the five-yard stage of the Super Test in 4.29 seconds, with each shot landing in the ten ring. I really suck at stage planning, so I haven't really seen measurable benefits for me in competition use the few matches I've dabbled in.

  8. #1108
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    Quote Originally Posted by ssb View Post
    Some food for thought about using a dot "for real:"

    I had the opportunity to take Tactical Scenarios, a force-on-force scenario/decisionmaking class from Karl Rehn, late last year. At various points I had my gun on people and at various points I shot people. I had my dot every time -- there was no "you won't see your sights in a gunfight," it was just superimposed on my target. On the one occasion I engaged in sighted fire with an iron sight gun, I presented, fired a few shots, and realized I should probably get on the iron sights if I wanted to hit anybody.

    Apart from the above, obviously, 25 yard shooting is far easier. For me, I'm at my iron sight speed (a deliberate 0.30s split time for almost everything) for most things, and recently did the five-yard stage of the Super Test in 4.29 seconds, with each shot landing in the ten ring. I really suck at stage planning, so I haven't really seen measurable benefits for me in competition use the few matches I've dabbled in.
    That's for the feedback. I've had presbyopia for the best part of ten years now.

    The RMR shipped today and the adapter plate is on the slide waiting for it. My typical splits at 10 yards and closer range from low 20s to the high teens, so at close distances my lack of visual accommodation makes me overrun what I can see through the sights and often shoot on pure index and target focus. If my index wavers a bit I get wide Cs and some Ds, or on tight targets no shoots or mikes. I'm hoping that the faster visual processing of a dot and target on the same focal plane will let me see those minor slips in time to fix them before I press the trigger.

    I'm not too worried about finding the dot on the draw. My index has gotten pretty damned good out of the holster over a year of heavy dry fire.

  9. #1109
    Hi Everyone, I have a weird question and I think It may just be the adjustment dials moving the inner housing but was curious as to what you think. A little background I just received a Aimpoint ACRO directly from Aimpoint (Shipped from them 12/31, received 1/6) through my work. I just went to the range and zeroed it in yesterday after work and I came home and was looking at it and when looking at it from the rear, it appears that the inner tube part of the sight is not centered in the ACRO rear glass and housing. I did achieve a great zero at 10 yards and only shot 100 rounds (The ACRO is mounted on a ATEI machined Glock 45). I think it may have something to do with the adjustment dials, I did need to move it up approx 10 clicks and right approx 4 clicks. When I noticed it it did try tracking the dials up and down to see if it made a noticeable difference but it didnít seem to move much. Are all of yours centered? Thanks in advance.



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  10. #1110
    The rear sight, located behind the Acro, blocks what you are looking at on my pistol.
    Likes pretty much everything in every caliber.

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