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Thread: Two handed magazine release?

  1. #21
    Having shorter thumbs and using a 1911 with standard size grips as my primary means I need to shift the pistol slightly to hit even an extended mag release. One trick that I've used with good success is to rotate the pistol using my firing hand index finger just enough to hit the mag release. You can see the bluing wear on the frame of my pistol where is do this (it's also my index point).

  2. #22
    Quote Originally Posted by NPV View Post
    Having shorter thumbs and using a 1911 with standard size grips as my primary means I need to shift the pistol slightly to hit even an extended mag release. One trick that I've used with good success is to rotate the pistol using my firing hand index finger just enough to hit the mag release. You can see the bluing wear on the frame of my pistol where is do this (it's also my index point).
    That seems a little common sense-ish.

    pat

  3. #23
    Quote Originally Posted by UNM1136 View Post
    That seems a little common sense-ish.

    pat
    Maybe so, but I hadn't seen it mentioned (then again I just skimmed most of the posts).

  4. #24
    Site Supporter RJ's Avatar
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    Ok so I am going to give this whole dominant hand thumb mag release another shot. I currently hit the mag release with my left middle finger.

    Two remarks and a question: in reading Ben Stoegerís Practical Pistol Reloaded, he says that relaxing the dominant hand and flipping the gun around will not cost much time and if done properly should be safe. He also says he uses this method. The other thought is that now I have a Glock extended mag release on both the 19 and 26.

    Which brings me to the question. Iím a lefty, so I will be moving the mag catch over to the right side so I can hit it with my left thumb.

    Are there any techniques I need to focus on in relearning my mag change, or is it just going to take repetitive work? Iím good with that, I just thought I would ask yaílls thoughts here.
    Last edited by RJ; 07-09-2018 at 09:57 PM.
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  5. #25
    Hobbyist JAD's Avatar
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    What problem is caused by releasing it with your trigger finger?

  6. #26
    Site Supporter RJ's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by JAD View Post
    What problem is caused by releasing it with your trigger finger?
    I have issues in hand strength relative to that particular finger. Plus, the gun ends up at an awkward angle and I typically have to consciously set it vertical, or shake the grip so it falls out.

    ETA: this is for middle (which I normally use) and trigger finger (which I have tried and have similar results).

    My perception is that my strong hand thumb will have greater leverage relative to the push I.e. the natural grasping/curling motion, vs. the middle finger.
    Last edited by RJ; 07-09-2018 at 10:01 PM.
    No one can pass through life, any more than he can pass through a bit of country, without leaving tracks behind, and those tracks may often be helpful to those coming after him in finding their way. --Robert Baden-Powell USPSA#A92555

  7. #27
    Hobbyist JAD's Avatar
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    Roger, makes sense .

  8. #28
    Quote Originally Posted by anthonymax007 View Post
    Hi everyone,

    Iíve got a newbie question for you all. Two handed mag release...Am I the only one who trains them? I find my strong hand thumb canít reach the mag release on either of my pistols (currently an M&P Shield and a Glock 19) without adjusting position and losing a good firing grip. Itís much easier and more efficient for me to use my weak hand thumb and release the mag prior to reloading with a new magazine. Does anyone have any thoughts regarding this? I donít want to be instilling bad habits, but Iím really noticing a difference I terms of reload speed and shot consistency since training this way. Iíve debated installing a mag release extension, but Iím not seeing any benefit after using this method.
    As someone mentioned, as you begin your reload sequence, slightly loosen your strong hand grip, at the same time exert just enough upward pressure against the trigger guard with the index finger of your support hand and allow the pistol to slightly shift in your hand as the support hand separates from the strong hand.

    At this point in the process one of the mistakes shooters often make is trying to reload at arm's length instead of naturally bending the elbows and bring the pistol into the 'working area' in front of your face.

    Done correctly (at least what I think is correctly) you should end up with the pistol in front of your eyes (more on this later) The muzzle should be elevated slightly, and if you stop to look you will find that this gives your magazine a straight drop out of the magwell with as little friction against the sides as possible.

    When depressing the mag release a big mistake folks make with the Glock is that they try to us the pad of their thumb, or index finger if they are left handed, rather than the tip or end of the thumb. You should be able to exert more force onto the mag release this way.

    Another mistake shooters make is they don't keep the mag release depressed until the mag has fallen completely free - really, some folks do that and they don't even realize it. Some folks also cover the other side of the mag release and keep it from moving to release the mag.

    A couple things I check myself on when practicing are:

    1) am I driving the upper arm elbow into my ribs (or vest) onto my touch point;
    2) is the pistol in the 'work space' in front of my eyes;
    3) is the muzzle elevated so the mag well is pretty close to perpendicular with mother earth;
    4) is the muzzle not going much beyond 45 degrees to the left or right - if you are concerned about that you can simply twist your upper torso left or right as needed to get the muzzle more downrange (some folks will tell you to shift your feet to do this, but my thought is if I ever need to do this for real I won't be standing still)
    5) is the index finger tip pressing on the mag release instead of the pad (I'm left handed so I use my trigger finger to release the mag)
    6) do I have a firm, proper grip on the new mag before I release the old mag
    7) am I seating the magazine in one fluid motion
    8) If an out-of-battery reload, is my support hand smoothly traveling to an over hand grip on the back of the slide and an then pulling the slide slightly to the rear and crisply releasing
    9) is my two hand grip established properly (once again think about touch points on the pistol and your other hand - are they the same)
    10) finger onto trigger as muzzle onto target

    Wow, I'm wordy.

  9. #29
    Site Supporter RJ's Avatar
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    Two handed magazine release?

    Quote Originally Posted by Dan Lehr View Post
    As someone mentioned, as you begin your reload sequence, slightly loosen your strong hand grip, at the same time exert just enough upward pressure against the trigger guard with the index finger of your support hand and allow the pistol to slightly shift in your hand as the support hand separates from the strong hand.

    At this point in the process one of the mistakes shooters often make is trying to reload at arm's length instead of naturally bending the elbows and bring the pistol into the 'working area' in front of your face.

    Done correctly (at least what I think is correctly) you should end up with the pistol in front of your eyes (more on this later) The muzzle should be elevated slightly, and if you stop to look you will find that this gives your magazine a straight drop out of the magwell with as little friction against the sides as possible.

    When depressing the mag release a big mistake folks make with the Glock is that they try to us the pad of their thumb, or index finger if they are left handed, rather than the tip or end of the thumb. You should be able to exert more force onto the mag release this way.

    Another mistake shooters make is they don't keep the mag release depressed until the mag has fallen completely free - really, some folks do that and they don't even realize it. Some folks also cover the other side of the mag release and keep it from moving to release the mag.

    A couple things I check myself on when practicing are:

    1) am I driving the upper arm elbow into my ribs (or vest) onto my touch point;
    2) is the pistol in the 'work space' in front of my eyes;
    3) is the muzzle elevated so the mag well is pretty close to perpendicular with mother earth;
    4) is the muzzle not going much beyond 45 degrees to the left or right - if you are concerned about that you can simply twist your upper torso left or right as needed to get the muzzle more downrange (some folks will tell you to shift your feet to do this, but my thought is if I ever need to do this for real I won't be standing still)
    5) is the index finger tip pressing on the mag release instead of the pad (I'm left handed so I use my trigger finger to release the mag)
    6) do I have a firm, proper grip on the new mag before I release the old mag
    7) am I seating the magazine in one fluid motion
    8) If an out-of-battery reload, is my support hand smoothly traveling to an over hand grip on the back of the slide and an then pulling the slide slightly to the rear and crisply releasing
    9) is my two hand grip established properly (once again think about touch points on the pistol and your other hand - are they the same)
    10) finger onto trigger as muzzle onto target

    Wow, I'm wordy.
    For a first post, that is good stuff.

    Thanks and welcome to p-f.

    Rich
    Last edited by RJ; 07-10-2018 at 04:41 PM.
    No one can pass through life, any more than he can pass through a bit of country, without leaving tracks behind, and those tracks may often be helpful to those coming after him in finding their way. --Robert Baden-Powell USPSA#A92555

  10. #30
    Quote Originally Posted by Dan Lehr View Post
    When depressing the mag release a big mistake folks make with the Glock is that they try to us the pad of their thumb, or index finger if they are left handed, rather than the tip or end of the thumb. You should be able to exert more force onto the mag release this way.

    Another mistake shooters make is they don't keep the mag release depressed until the mag has fallen completely free - really, some folks do that and they don't even realize it. Some folks also cover the other side of the mag release and keep it from moving to release the mag.
    I hadn't even thought about the tip of the thumb versus the pad. Thanks for that insight. I ran through it a couple of times and it really makes a difference. I'm also guilty of covering the other side of the mag release. Just made a couple changes to address this and I'm already seeing an improvement. Thanks again.

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