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Thread: Lock your doors

  1. #71
    Paws Before Boots Coyotesfan97's Avatar
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    Mar 2011
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    Phoenix Metro, AZ
    Quote Originally Posted by Cypher View Post
    I'm surprised that so many people around me don't think about stuff like that. When I was a roving guard for the utilities I drove through most of Colorado Springs every night and I was surprised at how many people leave their garage doors open all night.
    I used to have an off duty job patrolling a neighborhood from 2200-0400. The HOA wanted us to locate open garage doors and tell the homeowner. My partner and I usually found 4-6 garage doors open a night.
    The bravest are surely those who have the clearest vision of what is before them, glory and danger alike, and yet notwithstanding, go out to meet it.* Thucydides 471BC

    "Hey! Let's be careful out there." Sgt Phil Esterhaus played by Michael Conrad

  2. #72
    Pizzagun Dilettante Joe in PNG's Avatar
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    Feb 2011
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    Papua New Guinea; formerly Florida
    Another fun third-world trick. Folks in the big cities of Lae and Port Moresby have been known to walk up to cars stuck in traffic, try a cardoor, and if unlocked, grab what's in reach and run off.
    "You win 100% of the fights you avoid. If you're not there when it happens, you don't lose." - William Aprill

  3. #73
    I’ve always locked my doors. Maybe its because my dad was a cop and running into people he arrested off duty while we were out and about was more common than ANYONE ever would like. Getting my girlfriend to lock them constantly is something I still work on.

    I work for a city that averages around 650ish car burglaries every year. I’d easily put money down that well over 3/4 of those are unlocked cars. Breaking car windows is usually reserved for something expensive in very open view. Every single BMV report I take the victim asks what they should have done to stop it. Why a grown adult needs to be explained why they need to lock the doors and keep valuables out of sight is beyond me.

    Took a report a couple weeks ago for a bmv. Victim asked the regular question. I give he regular answer. Her response? That’s what the officer told me to do last year when this happened to me too I must have forgot last night. *facepalm*

    Forced entry BMVs and residential burglaries are rare. A forced entry BMV without visible expensive items (including your purses ladies) is extremely rare. Most “residential burglaries” are drug rips or relationship issues not random. Do they happen? Yes. Regularly? No.

    Theirs a gang of juveniles from Chicago whose MO is solely cruising the suburbs and trying unlocked cars that are left in driveways with the keyless start fobs sitting in them. They drive your car right out of your driveway to do with as they please because taking your fob inside and locking your door was too much of a hassle.


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  4. #74
    Member
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    Feb 2016
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    In exile, behind the lines
    Quote Originally Posted by cmbarny2 View Post
    I’ve always locked my doors. Maybe its because my dad was a cop and running into people he arrested off duty while we were out and about was more common than ANYONE ever would like. Getting my girlfriend to lock them constantly is something I still work on.

    I work for a city that averages around 650ish car burglaries every year. I’d easily put money down that well over 3/4 of those are unlocked cars. Breaking car windows is usually reserved for something expensive in very open view. Every single BMV report I take the victim asks what they should have done to stop it. Why a grown adult needs to be explained why they need to lock the doors and keep valuables out of sight is beyond me.

    Took a report a couple weeks ago for a bmv. Victim asked the regular question. I give he regular answer. Her response? That’s what the officer told me to do last year when this happened to me too I must have forgot last night. *facepalm*

    Forced entry BMVs and residential burglaries are rare. A forced entry BMV without visible expensive items (including your purses ladies) is extremely rare. Most “residential burglaries” are drug rips or relationship issues not random. Do they happen? Yes. Regularly? No.

    Theirs a gang of juveniles from Chicago whose MO is solely cruising the suburbs and trying unlocked cars that are left in driveways with the keyless start fobs sitting in them. They drive your car right out of your driveway to do with as they please because taking your fob inside and locking your door was too much of a hassle.


    Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
    In my town, window smash auto boosts are the norm...even if the car is unlocked. They don't even bother to.check. And we average several hundred burglaries a week. A lot of this is regional...but if you're going to San Francisco, forget the flowers in your hair...rent your vehicle in the.city (local ordinance prohibits the little barcode sticker on the window that ids the car as a rental to thieves), leave your valuables at the hotel...and leave NOTHING visible inside the car. 'But I was only gone 30 minutes! It happened so fast!' Really....how long do people think it takes to pop a window?

  5. #75
    Pragmatist Fuddite Sidheshooter's Avatar
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    Aug 2013
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    PacNW
    Quote Originally Posted by Joe in PNG View Post
    Another fun third-world trick. Folks in the big cities of Lae and Port Moresby have been known to walk up to cars stuck in traffic, try a cardoor, and if unlocked, grab what's in reach and run off.
    Not just a third-world problem (unless you consider parts of SoCal third-world... )


  6. #76
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    Feb 2012
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    Madison, Wisconsin
    One of the very first calls I ever got as a rookie cop (1981) was a theft of bicycle. I go talk to the lady and she's all indignant because her kid's new bicycle got stolen right out the garage. Further investigation revealed that the garage was left wide open with the door open because "we don't usually bother" to close the door at night. They didn't have much info on the bike other than color and manufacturer, no serial number or anything. The lady was indignant because I wouldn't dust for fingerprints inside the garage. I explained that the thief didn't have to TOUCH anything to steal the bike -- all he had to do was walk in the open garage, grab the bike and go. She complained to the Chief that I had a bad attitude. He tuned her up in a polite way in response and was quite proud of himself for being tactful.

    In my career I've had one full time job and also worked for three other small departments as a part time officer (all of them pretty average in their activity level). Back in the middle 90s I worked for a township that had a part time police department. One summer evening I got dispatched to a house fire. It was a big, relatively new and fancy home in a sub-division of nice homes and it was fully involved when I rolled up with the fire department.

    The Sheriff's Department arrived to assist. In the crowd of people walking was one guy who was talking to himself and acting agitated and when the deputy went to talk to him, he ran and we chased him and ultimately caught him. Further investigation revealed that he was a delivery boy for the evening newspaper. Many of the people in the neighborhood recognized him. On the day of the incident he was seen cruising around the neighborhood. Further investigation revealed that he had entered this house through the unlocked front door, found that nobody was at home, he stole a few items which he took out to his car, and then he lit the house on fire.

    I interviewed the father while we were watching the house burn down. He and his wife were next door at the neighbors and his daughters were down the street at a friend's house. Because it was daylight and they were "just down the street for a minute" they didn't think to lock the front door.

    Momma and both teenage daughters (11 and 13 or something like that) were attractive ladies. I think it possible the suspect knew that and entered with intentions other than being an arsonist, although that was never established. It couldn've been a real tragedy had a few things been different.

    Last spring in one weekend in one of the towns of our county three guns were stolen from the interior of unlocked cars. All Glocks of different models. Two of three or three out of three of those guns were later involved in gang related shooting incidents in the city.

    Locking your car and locking your house doesn't mean you are "living in fear". It means you accept the reality of the world.
    Last edited by Jeff22; 05-22-2018 at 02:27 AM.

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