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Thread: My new Colt Cobra

  1. #51
    Quote Originally Posted by willie View Post
    Long ago I decided that few handguns were pocket pistols despite having that designation. People would say things like "if I were going to use a holster, I'd carry something bigger than that Walther PP or that...",and I'd point out the larger size and weight of their choice. Here I'm speaking from civilian perspective and not law enforcement. Also, as people age, larger and heavier handguns are not as conveniently carried as in earlier years. When I go fishing with l.e. friends, I don't carry because they are armed. I've become lazy. But I can still outshoot these guys on paper. Shooting is not their passion.
    And I would rather have an M&P 340 in my pocket that I can get a real 1 second draw on from my hands in my pockets than depend on others to carry for me. I relish the day when I am old enough to live a true snub lifestyle. I am on vacation right now and wearing board shorts and a t shirt most of the time. The Cobra is getting a ton of carry in a small fanny pack. Holds two important things, a gun I can shoot and a wallet.
    For everything I like the Night Cobra for, I have had my pet 2.25” S&W 649. The 649 is more refined, but the Colt gives me another round.
    Just a Hairy Special Snowflake supply clerk with no field experience, shooting an Asymetric carbine as a Try Hard. Snarky and easily butt hurt. Favorite animal is the Cape Buffalo....likely indicative of a personality disorder.
    "If I had a grandpa, he would look like Delbert Belton".

  2. #52
    I got to handle a cobra in the LGS, the other day. Man was it rough. I've accepted Colt's lack of dehorning/finishing on their 1911's for years, as all of mine would head to the gunsmith anyway, but this was the worst Colt I've seen. The shop owner was thinking that he should send it back

  3. #53
    Site Supporter
    Join Date
    Dec 2011
    Location
    Athens, AL, USA
    Quote Originally Posted by theJanitor View Post
    I got to handle a cobra in the LGS, the other day. Man was it rough. I've accepted Colt's lack of dehorning/finishing on their 1911's for years, as all of mine would head to the gunsmith anyway, but this was the worst Colt I've seen. The shop owner was thinking that he should send it back
    I have seen pictures of some Cobras that should not have been shipped from Colt, including one with a poorly fit sideplate and one whose cylinder strikes the forcing cone when closing the cylinder, so I checked my samples over before completing the Form 4473. I may have been lucky, but both of mine are well fit. Neither of mine are early production, so that may be proof that Colt has been solving issues.

  4. #54
    Quote Originally Posted by Dagga Boy View Post
    Trust me, I agree on pocket carry with either. Both are too heavy. With my size I can and have pocket carried the Cobra. It will never replace my M&P 340ís. Where I see it pocket carried is more of someone answering the door or checking a suspicious noise in a yard or with snake shot in certain areas slipped in a back pocket. I would agree that Colt should really be looking hard at an aluminum framed Lightweight Cobra where it could excel in a primary gun, daily pocket carry type system for a good number of people, especially with a boot grip along with the bobbed hammer.
    I just handled one and my thoughts were the same. Boot grips and an alloy frame and I'll have one. Having never seen the grips off of the pistol, will it allow a boot grip?
    uneducated and low information
    I'll wager you a PF dollar..
    He needed a healthy dose of bonded bullets. LSP552

  5. #55
    Site Supporter
    Join Date
    Dec 2011
    Location
    Athens, AL, USA
    Added another revolver to the compare. In this case, the closest J-frame to an (vaporware as of now) alloy framed Cobra, the S&W M360J. The M360J is a Chief's Special (traditional DA/SA hammer spur) revolver that is not within S&W's catalog although it has been produced sporadically since 2009. It uses the Scandium Alloy frame (Magnum J-frame) of the M360 .357, but uses a fluted cylinder chambered in .38 Special. It is rated for +P ammo. It also has a pinned front sight (ramp), a two-piece barrel, and weighs 14.7 ounces with the supplied grips. Hogue Bantams drop the weight to 13.7 ounces and expose a lanyard hole in the bottom of the grip frame. As such, the serial number is not on the grip frame; it is on the frame below the cylinder thumb release nut. It can also be found on the frame inside the crane. Unfortunately it has the S&W internal lock.

    Felt recoil is, ahh, brisk. The Hogue Bantams are not helpful unless you like baseball bat smacks to the palm. The stock grips are much nicer in this regard, but extend well below the grip frame. This gun needs grips with an enclosed back strap that also leave the bottom of the grip frame uncovered. The stock black front ramp is hard to pick up in some lighting, but a bit of orange nail polish solves that. Night sights are available, but my sample is not yet equipped. The lock on my sample did not engage when shooting, but I will likely remove the lock innards for peace of mind. The action is typical .38 Special J-frame.

    The M360J, when sold, goes for about $400 or $200 less than a steel-framed Cobra. Even with a sight change, it is $100 less than the stainless steel Cobra.
    Last edited by farscott; 06-30-2018 at 04:30 PM.

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