Page 1 of 2 12 LastLast
Results 1 to 10 of 11

Thread: Isoceles and two handed strong arm shooting alignment

  1. #1

    Isoceles and two handed strong arm shooting alignment

    Do you align your shooting arm from pistol to web of your hand, bones of forearm When shooting two handed grip isoceles?
    If not how do you extend your strong hand when doing 2 handed isoceles grip? Is is more chicken wing or not?
    Attached Images Attached Images  

  2. #2
    I don't. For me aligning it that way is a wrong priority. It may happen more or less by itself, depending on a gun, but not as a primary goal.

  3. #3
    Site Supporter Peally's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2014
    Location
    Wisconsin, USA
    Nope, not really possible in an isosceles stance and it provides no advantage.

    My rough grip after taking support hand off:

    Name:  20180414_090702.jpg
Views: 436
Size:  76.0 KB

    It's a dainty pussy hand with a giant 45 but you get the idea. It isn't straight in line with the arm at all. Keep in mind I'm left eye dominant so you may look a little less extreme than this, but at no point should you care if your arm is aligned with the barrel.
    Last edited by Peally; 04-14-2018 at 09:13 AM.
    Semper Gumby, Always Flexible

  4. #4
    Hobbyist JAD's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2011
    Location
    Dallas

    Isoceles and two handed strong arm shooting alignment

    I think @Tom Givens teaches bore/bone alignment but thatís just how the hand meets the gun; if I then bend my wrist to get into iso thatís ok. If I crawl the grip (clocking it around to put more finger on the trigger) I donít address the trigger as well. Iíve tried, because I have small hands and more finger should benefit me with large guns. It donít.
    Last edited by JAD; 04-14-2018 at 09:25 AM.

  5. #5
    Site Supporter Peally's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2014
    Location
    Wisconsin, USA
    Quote Originally Posted by JAD View Post
    I think @Tom Givens teaches bore/bone alignment but that’s just how the hand meets the gun; if I then bend my wrist to get into iso that’s ok. If I crawl the grip (clocking it around to put more finger on the trigger) I don’t address the trigger as well. I’ve tried, because I have small hands and more finger should benefit me with large guns. It don’t.
    Pretty much yeah, your grip is right behind the gun but your wrist is bent.
    Semper Gumby, Always Flexible

  6. #6
    Site Supporter
    Join Date
    Aug 2011
    Location
    TEXAS !
    Depends on the hand and the gun.

  7. #7
    Site Supporter taadski's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2012
    Location
    Colorado
    This thread makes for an interesting analogue to GJM's Tactical Performance Center class review thread. In particular the bits about how strong hand alignment can effect the ability to get the "meat" of the weak hand behind the gun. To answer your question though, by definition, in the pure isosceles "stance", the bones of your forearms are not going to be in direct alignment with the pistol. The pistol rather will be closer to splitting the angle made by your arms.

    Some googling yielded some images of these couple of jamokes for reference:





    This is not to take away from the fact that there are some very good shooters who utilize some sort of modified isosceles in which the bend in the arms are less equal and the pistol is more aligned with the strong arm. But it's not something you usually see amongst the elite.


    t

  8. #8
    Quote Originally Posted by taadski View Post
    This thread makes for an interesting analogue to GJM's Tactical Performance Center class review thread. In particular the bits about how strong hand alignment can effect the ability to get the "meat" of the weak hand behind the gun. To answer your question though, by definition, in the pure isosceles "stance", the bones of your forearms are not going to be in direct alignment with the pistol. The pistol rather will be closer to splitting the angle made by your arms.

    Some googling yielded some images of these couple of jamokes for reference:





    This is not to take away from the fact that there are some very good shooters who utilize some sort of modified isosceles in which the bend in the arms are less equal and the pistol is more aligned with the strong arm. But it's not something you usually see amongst the elite.


    t
    Thank you for sharing. Sometimes shooting and experimenting what will work better deviates from what is natural and proper. Love this group.

    Sent from my SM-J701F using Tapatalk

  9. #9
    Site Supporter NH Shooter's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2014
    Location
    New Hampshire, U.S.A.
    Having spent over a decade shooting Bullseye competitively, the alignment shown in the OP is the proper "Bullseye grip." But as others have commented, this alignment does not happen with two-handed isosceles. When drawing with the intent to shoot strong hand only, I do find myself favoring the old Bullseye grip as it really does help with recoil control and keeping the sights aligned.

    For those of us cursed with small hands and/or short fingers, grip geometry and "length of pull" to the trigger face are critical for a proper Bullseye grip. Due to its pronounced 2-stage trigger pull (long, light first stage, short second stage with short reset) and grip ergonomics, the PPQ has been the only double-stack I can maintain a Bullseye grip on through a string of fire.

  10. #10
    Site Supporter
    Join Date
    Oct 2014
    Location
    Savannah, GA
    Quote Originally Posted by taadski View Post
    This thread makes for an interesting analogue to GJM's Tactical Performance Center class review thread. In particular the bits about how strong hand alignment can effect the ability to get the "meat" of the weak hand behind the gun. To answer your question though, by definition, in the pure isosceles "stance", the bones of your forearms are not going to be in direct alignment with the pistol. The pistol rather will be closer to splitting the angle made by your arms.

    This is not to take away from the fact that there are some very good shooters who utilize some sort of modified isosceles in which the bend in the arms are less equal and the pistol is more aligned with the strong arm. But it's not something you usually see amongst the elite.
    This is spot on. In general if you grip the gun with the slide oriented directly back toward your strong hand wrist like that in an isosceles stance, the recoil will not go straight up and down and it will be harder to track and reset your front sight for follow up shots.
    Formerly givo08.

User Tag List

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •  

TLG 1970–2016 RIPRampageForTheCure.org