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Thread: Lee Precision Launching New Press--Lee Auto Breech Lock

  1. #121
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    Quote Originally Posted by Tokarev View Post
    As I think I've mentioned; I have used the Pro1000 without the priming system. Put a sizing/decapping die in a tool head and run the cases through using the case feeder. Prime cases off press using a handheld tool. Take a Lee tool head and put the powder measure in station one, a seating die in station two and a factory crimp die in station three. Run primed brass through using the case feeder.

    This is a very speedy way to load and has worked well for me the few times I've done it. The slowest/weirdest part of the whole process is placing the bullet into the case mouth at the back of the press on the left side of the case.
    Yep I agree, priming off press the breech lock is a pretty good press and I can can crank out quite a bit of ammo.
    I still have a Lee turret and the priming on that wasn't to bad. So I'm thinking of setting that up to do the decapping and prime.

    If I actually sat down and added up the cost of both presses and all of the other bits I bet I'm pretty close to Dillion at this point.

  2. #122
    Quote Originally Posted by Whirlwind06 View Post
    Yep I agree, priming off press the breech lock is a pretty good press and I can can crank out quite a bit of ammo.
    I still have a Lee turret and the priming on that wasn't to bad. So I'm thinking of setting that up to do the decapping and prime.

    If I actually sat down and added up the cost of both presses and all of the other bits I bet I'm pretty close to Dillion at this point.
    Pretty close in price to a Square Deal maybe. Not a 650 or 750 especially once you add a case feeder.

    Lee stuff is what it is. Generally their products work well especially for the money.

    Anyway, if you have a Turret the easy solution is to size and prime on that machine and then progressive load on the other. Not a terrible way to go and it should be fairly speedy.

    Correction to my post above. I said placing the bullet on the case with the left hand. I meant with the right hand since the powdered case is at Station Two.

  3. #123
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    I have a Square Deal B which works well. Dedicated to one caliber, it excels. Having owned all, I now tell everybody and his dog to buy a 550 and be done with trying to figure out what's best. Everybody should have a single stage also. Cheaper ones are ok. Dillon dies are good.

  4. #124
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    Quote Originally Posted by willie View Post
    I have a Square Deal B which works well. Dedicated to one caliber, it excels. Having owned all, I now tell everybody and his dog to buy a 550 and be done with trying to figure out what's best. Everybody should have a single stage also. Cheaper ones are ok. Dillon dies are good.
    Iím really interested in getting the 550 but dropping that much coin on a press that doesnít have a casefeeder AND is not progressive either is making it a no-go.

  5. #125
    Quote Originally Posted by TOTS View Post
    Iím really interested in getting the 550 but dropping that much coin on a press that doesnít have a casefeeder AND is not progressive either is making it a no-go.
    There is a big price jump from a serviceable 550 to a fully progressive press with a case feeder, assuming weíre only talking about Dillons here.

    If youíre only loading 1 pistol caliber and have the coin for it, a 750 with a case feeder makes a lot of sense. The 550 is a very good mix of economy and efficiency as far as presses go, though. Especially if youíre talking about loading multiple calibers and/or rifle rounds.


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  6. #126
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    The 550 is considered progressive, and the design allows reloading handgun or rifle ammo. That the shell plate is rotated by hand is a simplicity which is an advantage because priming and powder dropping issues that could arise often do not. Reason is that pulling the handle does not move the cases to the next step. The operator does with a flick of the wrist. Case and bullet feeders introduce more complexity to reloading. Because even simple machines have a learning curve, beginning with a case feeder might be a tad too challenging for some. We differ in technical aptitude. Mine is low. Others have a high one. Another consideration is volume of ammo needed.

  7. #127
    Site Supporter GreggW's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by TOTS View Post
    Iím really interested in getting the 550 but dropping that much coin on a press that doesnít have a casefeeder AND is not progressive either is making it a no-go.
    A 550 is not slow to reload on.
    ďIf you know the way broadly you will see it in everything." - Miyamoto Musashi

  8. #128
    Hobbyist JAD's Avatar
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    Nope, and is much more versatile than many other presses.

  9. #129
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    Hornady has its fan boys and for good reason. I spent a large number of hours studying the Hornady progressives. Some say that they require more tinkering and adjustment than Dillon machines. I would say the difference between the two brands is not quality per se. My opinion is that Dillon engineers used a fairly trouble free, less complicated design. Today many shooters fire 10-20,1000 rounds per year of reloaded ammo. Dillon serves this group well. For the person shooting 4 or or 5 1000 rds/year, brand choice may not matter.
    Last edited by willie; 10-23-2019 at 08:46 PM.

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