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Thread: My First Competition as a newbie.

  1. #21
    At the match, one thing that helps is to mentally prepared and visualized using clusterfrack's recommendation.

    I'd add one thing, and that is to think about what you want to do, not what you want to avoid doing. So for example, if you have a partial target with a no shoot, instead of thinking to yourself do not shoot the white target, tell yourself that you will shoot the middle of the brown target area.

  2. #22
    Site Supporter Peally's Avatar
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    Welcome to the fun zone. Don't worry about the G19, in a true baller's hands that gun would bring you a decent placement at nationals regardless. When you've been doing USPSA for a while you'll figure out what you'll want to replace it with (17, 34, whatever) but for now I would just have fun with it. I started with a big uncompetitive 45 in production and it wasn't until I was mid A class when I switched guns. I'm shooting a VP9 now but it's still bone stock aside from the sights and got me to M, and GM is entirely possible. Gear can help here and there but it's veeeeery low on the reason list for someone screwing something up on a stage.

    Practice going fast, hitting A zones, and not forgetting targets. Easier said than done sometimes
    Last edited by Peally; 03-27-2018 at 10:31 AM.
    Semper Gumby, Always Flexible

  3. #23
    Site Supporter Clusterfrack's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by scw2 View Post
    At the match, one thing that helps is to mentally prepared and visualized using clusterfrack's recommendation.

    I'd add one thing, and that is to think about what you want to do, not what you want to avoid doing. So for example, if you have a partial target with a no shoot, instead of thinking to yourself do not shoot the white target, tell yourself that you will shoot the middle of the brown target area.
    Yes. ^^^this. Quick story:

    A couple years ago I shot a stage really well, except for a M/No-Shoot on a tight partial. Dammit! But then someone taped a target before scoring and I got a reshoot. Yes!

    I spent the rest of the time I had visualizing the stage, and focusing on NOT shooting that No-Shoot. Here’s what happened:

    Conscious mind: this is going really well!

    Subconscious: Shoots targets, reloads, moves.

    Conscious mind: Oh oh, here comes that NS. Don’t shoot it!

    Subconscious: shoots NS dead center.

    Conscious: WTF??? Make that up!

    Subconscious: shoots NS dead center, twice.

    Moral of the story: subconscious doesn’t understand negatives.
    "BJJ is sort of like nonconsensual yoga"
    "You don’t really graduate from certain problems or certain things… like you always have to work on trigger control and pulling the trigger straight. " --Ben Stoeger 1/24/2018

  4. #24
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    Did another competition today, my 3rd. It was a USPSA type all steel today, (very windy so paper was a no go). 6 stages, did pretty well but each stage but one I just a couple errors that killed my time. 5 sec penalties so accuracy as key. I did win one stage so that was awesome. It was pure speed on 6 targets with a mixture of square and circles in which you had to hit the squares twice, total 16 rounds with a reload. Ran it at 13 sec. getting better each time and had a bunch of fun. Pretty addicting, can't wait for the next one, if I can ever run these clean I'll be super thrilled and will do well.

  5. #25
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    Edit above. I won my squad of 15, not the entire stage. 4th out of 23, the other squad had some high level shooters.

  6. #26
    Member holmes168's Avatar
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    Where are you shooting at? I see your in North Texas....
    Every day in transportation makes me feel like I brought a toothpick to a gun fight.

  7. #27
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    It was up at a place called Proactive defense up by Argle, near the racetrack on I-35. They have NTLF do matches once a month up there.
    Last edited by Dismas316; 04-15-2018 at 10:06 PM.

  8. #28
    Site Supporter GuanoLoco's Avatar
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    Hardware is fine, you need to work on your software.

    Get a dry fire training program. Ben Stoeger has good books. Steve Anderson has good books. Pick one. Develop your subconscious gun handling skills in dry fire so you don’t have to think about them. Test those skills in live fire practice.

    Learn to develop and memorize a stage plan so you can execute it without thinking about it much. This comes with practice.

    Going slow to get your hits isn’t going to work. You will get your hits, but you will also be so slow that it won’t matter.

    Learn to grip properly, then grip hard and shoot as fast as you can see an acceptable sight picture. This will improve with dry/live practice, but any given daym it is what it is. Make a point of hustling and doing everything BUT the shooting as fast as you can.

    The only thing you should be actively thinking about is seeing an acceptable sight picture.
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  9. #29
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    Quote Originally Posted by GuanoLoco View Post
    Hardware is fine, you need to work on your software.


    Learn to develop and memorize a stage plan so you can execute it without thinking about it much. This comes with practice.
    All ll good advice and I have been doing exactly that. But you’re right on with the software part. I think my biggest issue has been stage planning. I tend to overthink/over analyze and that gets me in a little trouble. (Keep changing the plan until Inshoot). Once Instarted sticking to the plan and have it memorized, I shoot much better.

    The guy guy who stages everything really complicates things by design so you really have to think about what your’re doing and have a good plan, which is challenging but I do like it. I also tend to try and over complicate it at times. Big area to work on for me.

  10. #30
    Site Supporter GuanoLoco's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Dismas316 View Post
    All ll good advice and I have been doing exactly that. But you’re right on with the software part. I think my biggest issue has been stage planning. I tend to overthink/over analyze and that gets me in a little trouble. (Keep changing the plan until Inshoot). Once Instarted sticking to the plan and have it memorized, I shoot much better.

    The guy guy who stages everything really complicates things by design so you really have to think about what your’re doing and have a good plan, which is challenging but I do like it. I also tend to try and over complicate it at times. Big area to work on for me.
    More consistent execution of an acceptable stage plan will beat less consistent execution of the best stage plan, all day long.
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