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Thread: LE UOF Video thread

  1. #21
    Member voodoo_man's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Hambo View Post
    A SWAT instructor once told me that he thought the decision to shoot dogs got made before the team ever rolled. Meaning that some are predisposed to think dogs are a threat while others aren't. I'm in the camp that thinks a lot of people overreact to dogs.
    I've flip flopped in both mindsets. Sometimes the team is told shoot all dogs on contact, sometimes we just do what we want. Now a days, I just let the dogs determine how I act towards them. The video outlined a very real scenario which I've been in several times, though thankfully I didn't have to shoot any dogs in those situations. One thing I tell people all the time is that you need to figure it out for yourself and not listen to others. Once a dog shows their intent (which is usually extreme obvious) you need to either act or run away very fast. I've seen officer's try to taze and OC spray dogs, that doesn't always work. I've had great results with 1000+ lumen flashlights in strobe on dogs that get aggressive at me at night, I don't know why but it seems to make them not come at me but stay where they are and bark or walk away from the light.

    Since shooting dogs is a polarizing topic for many, I always like to add that I've seen first hand what happens when dogs attack, the person always goes to the hospital and if they are not stopped at that moment they are going to be difficult to deal with in the future.

    I also recently saw this video, pretty brutal, thankfully NYC doesn't let you defend yourself...from anything...

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=uoMmE90DeyQ
    Last edited by voodoo_man; 09-12-2015 at 04:10 PM.
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  2. #22
    Site Supporter Nephrology's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by voodoo_man View Post
    I've flip flopped in both mindsets. Sometimes the team is told shoot all dogs on contact, sometimes we just do what we want. Now a days, I just let the dogs determine how I act towards them. The video outlined a very real scenario which I've been in several times, though thankfully I didn't have to shoot any dogs in those situations. One thing I tell people all the time is that you need to figure it out for yourself and not listen to others. Once a dog shows their intent (which is usually extreme obvious) you need to either act or run away very fast. I've seen officer's try to taze and OC spray dogs, that doesn't always work. I've had great results with 1000+ lumen flashlights in strobe on dogs that get aggressive at me at night, I don't know why but it seems to make them not come at me but stay where they are and bark or walk away from the light.

    Since shooting dogs is a polarizing topic for many, I always like to add that I've seen first hand what happens when dogs attack, the person always goes to the hospital and if they are not stopped at that moment they are going to be difficult to deal with in the future.

    I also recently saw this video, pretty brutal, thankfully NYC doesn't let you defend yourself...from anything...

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=uoMmE90DeyQ
    Those are two dogs that needed to get shot way sooner than later.

  3. #23
    Member voodoo_man's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Nephrology View Post
    Those are two dogs that needed to get shot way sooner than later.
    My point with this video is to show what happens if not stopped.
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  4. #24
    Site Supporter Nephrology's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by voodoo_man View Post
    My point with this video is to show what happens if not stopped.
    Your point is very well made.

  5. #25
    Quote Originally Posted by voodoo_man View Post
    My point with this video is to show what happens if not stopped.
    It looks like most of the good samaritans trying to help were pretty adverse/incapable of using any real force on the dogs. I only saw one guy swing what looked like a 2 foot piece of chain, but everyone else looked like they were just trying to pull them off the guy.

    Pretty interesting insight into how that breed goes about business. There were a few times when there were a handful of people around the dogs, and one guy even standing over the victim, and the dogs were still locked in on the guy in the yellow.

  6. #26
    Paws Before Boots Coyotesfan97's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Hambo View Post
    A SWAT instructor once told me that he thought the decision to shoot dogs got made before the team ever rolled. Meaning that some are predisposed to think dogs are a threat while others aren't. I'm in the camp that thinks a lot of people overreact to dogs.
    When I was on the team we rarely shot dogs. A LSDD works wonders on driving off dogs. Beanbags work well to if needed after that. One dog thrown into the mix works wonders on messing up an entry that's for sure. We could've justified shooting some of them but didn't.

    Most dogs are defensive. That means they're mostly posturing. It depends on the breed but I've driven off plenty of dogs with a loud negative command and shining a flashlight in their eyes. I go into a lot of yards at night with my dog and encounter other dogs occasionally.

    I use Pfui (Phooey) but that's from working Dutch dogs. But a loud Pfui works on dogs that have never even heard it. Reading dogs can be tricky but most of them are not going to carry out a determined aggressive attack

    Fortunately I've kept them off me and my dog. He's been attacked a couple times by loose dogs in the street but I or my backups have driven them off without shooting any of them. Tasers work great for 21 feet if you get a good connection. After 21 feet the wires break when the dogs running off.

    I worked with a former animal control guy who'd just use an extended ASP in his hand like a short noose pole. He said it was all you need. I've seen plenty of dogs instinctively shy away from noose poles.
    The bravest are surely those who have the clearest vision of what is before them, glory and danger alike, and yet notwithstanding, go out to meet it.* Thucydides 471BC

    "Hey! Let's be careful out there." Sgt Phil Esterhaus played by Michael Conrad

  7. #27
    Licorice Bootlegger JDM's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Coyotesfan97 View Post
    When I was on the team we rarely shot dogs. A LSDD works wonders on driving off dogs. Beanbags work well to if needed after that. One dog thrown into the mix works wonders on messing up an entry that's for sure. We could've justified shooting some of them but didn't.

    Most dogs are defensive. That means they're mostly posturing. It depends on the breed but I've driven off plenty of dogs with a loud negative command and shining a flashlight in their eyes. I go into a lot of yards at night with my dog and encounter other dogs occasionally.

    I use Pfui (Phooey) but that's from working Dutch dogs. But a loud Pfui works on dogs that have never even heard it. Reading dogs can be tricky but most of them are not going to carry out a determined aggressive attack

    Fortunately I've kept them off me and my dog. He's been attacked a couple times by loose dogs in the street but I or my backups have driven them off without shooting any of them. Tasers work great for 21 feet if you get a good connection. After 21 feet the wires break when the dogs running off.

    I worked with a former animal control guy who'd just use an extended ASP in his hand like a short noose pole. He said it was all you need. I've seen plenty of dogs instinctively shy away from noose poles.
    LSDD?
    Nobody is impressed by what you can't do. -THJ

  8. #28
    Paws Before Boots Coyotesfan97's Avatar
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    The bravest are surely those who have the clearest vision of what is before them, glory and danger alike, and yet notwithstanding, go out to meet it.* Thucydides 471BC

    "Hey! Let's be careful out there." Sgt Phil Esterhaus played by Michael Conrad

  9. #29
    Licorice Bootlegger JDM's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Coyotesfan97 View Post
    Light Sound Diversionary Device


    Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
    Thanks!
    Nobody is impressed by what you can't do. -THJ

  10. #30
    Quote Originally Posted by Symmetry View Post
    I feel that a dog is the equivalent of setting a booby trap(which are illegal pretty much everywhere). Dogs are known for attacking children that wander onto someone's property to retrieve a ball. Dogs in general are loose cannons, and even the most highly trained ones can be unpredictable under stress......especially when they are not leashed by the owner. I have seen my share of mauled children over the years, and the owner has always insisted that their dog was sweet and loving.
    Sounds just like LEO's I've worked with over the years who are either irrationally afraid of dogs, or just itching to use their sidearm. There are times when the appropriate response is to shoot a dog. But most situations don't require it in my experience. I'd recommend you spend more time learning about them rather than casting them all as "unpredictable" and "booby traps." Unless it's a group of attacking dogs, a single animal can usually be dealt with without resorting to deadly force.

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