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Thread: Beretta 92D With Updates

  1. #81
    Member JonInWA's Avatar
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    Quick update: After approximately 12K rounds, I decided to replace my 1996-vintage OEM Gen 2 locking block with the current one, a Gen 3 https://berettaforum.net/vb/showpost...3&postcount=18 (While my 92D was manufactured in 1996, I didn't actually buy it, BNIB until 2006, which was its actual commencement of use date).

    And a lengthier discussion of Beretta locking blocks is here: https://berettaforum.net/vb/showthread.php?t=45325

    While mine with its OEM Gen 2 was running just fine, I decided it would be prudent simply to replace it, as "normal" locking block anomalies have been seen to crop up as early as the 12K point. (Outlier issues, while unusual, can crop up both earlier and later, and "normal" forecasted locking block longevity is around the 15K to 20K roundcount from what I've read and researched on these earlier locking blocks, and at the 20K to 30K interval for the later current Gen 3 locking blocks. So replacing mine at its roundcount was arguably overkill, but I'm considering it inexpensive preventive maintenance.

    Erik Stern at BUSA (and a p-f member and participant) and I recently had an excellent discussion on it; he suggested that the replacement block normally doesn't need to be fitted, but to watch for any eccentric wear in the slide from the previous block buy looking for an even fit with no light bars showing when the new one is installed. Mine seems to fit nicely with no additional fitting needed. If fitting is needed, it's essential to do it, as the replacement block's longevity can be severely compromised by the eccentric wear/stress it has to deal with.

    While a pretty straightforward and simple process, BUSA has an excellent Youtube segment that I strongly recommend watching: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=lWO5cBl1FvI

    It's easy to follow, with some very succinct tips. For a punch, since the retaining pin is a roll pin, I used a roll pin punch, which speeds up and stabilizes the process (both on pin removal and installation), and eliminates damage to the old roll pin (which of course I immediately lost on my garage workshop floor when attempting to bag it for potential re-use...).

    Beretta has 2 locking block kits, one with a replacement recoil spring and the other without it. Since I'm running a Wilson Combat 14# silicon chrome recoil spring, I opted for the kit without, which includes the locking block, plunger pin, and retaining roll pin.

    I wiped down the new block and plunger pin with Weapon Shield prior to installation, and also placed some Lucas Red "N" Tacky #2 grease in the portion of the barrel lug that the nose of the locking block fits and moves.

    It's really just a 5 minute job at most.

    Best, Jon
    Last edited by JonInWA; 10-26-2018 at 12:51 PM.

  2. #82
    Member JonInWA's Avatar
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    Latest update: With p-f member Jeep's suggestions and guidance, and after watching a YouTube segment twice on 92 slide disassembly, I just removed my extractor, firing pin block and firing pin, cleaning and re-lubricating as necessary, and replacing the OEM firing pin spring with one of Wilson Combat's chrome silicon firing pin spring. Here are the details, in all the glorious micro-detailed discussion that you guys have come to expect from me:

    Done Jeep-and thanks for the encouragement and guidance. Pretty straightforward, as you said. I annually remove, clean and re-spring my extractor (the re-springing part is as necessary, which is really probably never, but since Wilson Combat provided me with 2 flavors of their chrome silicon extractor springs {standard and +), last year I removed my OEM Beretta one for the heck of it, and used the standard weight Wilson Combat one-its running just fine).

    The firing pin block removal was very straightforward-just punch out the retaining roll pin with a 1/16th" roll pin punch, push down from the top (with a thumb on the rear of the firing pin to preclude it from launching into orbit), and it falls out (there's a small coil spring that tensions it, I removed it as well) and then pulled out the firing pin and firing pin spring (which was a little stubborn, and a Q-Tip was used to pull it out). While you could probably get away with using a flat 1/16th" punch, the roll pin punch both helps in the removal and re-installation process, and maintains the integrity of the roll pin itself, so using the right tools pays off-in this case the 2 sets of Lyman pistol maintenance punches (one standard flat, one roll-pin) I've invested in.

    All components were de-grunged, cleaned, and lightly lubed with Dri-Slide, a molybdenum disulfate dry film lubrication solution suspended in a liquid carrier-the liquid carrier solution evaporates, and you have an evenly deposited a dry lubricant film that lubricates without serving as a GSR magnet. The Beretta manual recommends a drop of lubricant applied to the firing pin hole at the breech and at the back of the firing pin where it projects from the back of the slide, but I much prefer the dry-film lubricant approach for theses assemblies.

    There really wasn't all that much accumulated on the firing pin, extractor and locking block, or in the firing pin, firing pin block and extractor chambers. It was worthwhile going in, but probably annually is sufficient for the extractor, and every couple of years for the firing pin/firing pin block. But since it's so easy on the D model, I'll probably just do the full meal deal annually.

    Despite that the OEM firing pin spring was running fine, since Wilson Combat had also graciously provided me with one of their chrome silicon firing pin springs, I replaced the OEM one with it (the Tech at BUSA that I spoke with yesterday said that he'd personally never seen or heard of an OEM firing pin spring breaking or losing tensility, but since I was already in there, I might as well just replace the original spring with a new one...). (And yes, I'm keeping the OEM one, just in case...).

    After reassembling everything, the extractor retaining pin needs to be re-staked (well, actually, it's the metal on the slide surrounding the extractor pin's hole that needs to be re-staked). Not much metal is required to be moved to accomplish this, and some 92 users have reported that the pin stays in place without re-staking, but I personally always do it. using a couple of hammer taps to a judiciously-placed small flat screwdriver blade, and then retouching with a dab of Birchwood Casey Black paint.

    Everytime I go into my Beretta 92, I'm reminded of the quality of the design and manufacturing that went into it. For example, when you re-insert the firing pin locking block and its spring, the firing pin nicely locks the assembly into place, making it easy to re-insert the roll pin used to secure it-no "three-handed drill" necessary (as compared to, say, replacing the extractor and firing pin stop on a 1911, especially a Series 80 firing pin safety on a 1911...). These are simply magnificently designed and manufactured pistols, and ones that we can thoroughly appreciate and use as designed. While my appreciation is more on the pragmatic side, it's is fun participating in the recent 92 Series Renaissance that seems to be occurring, and concurrently appreciating how Bill Wilson, Ernest Langdon and others are applying their efforts to tangibly improve the platform (and in how both Bill Wilson, Ernest Langdon, Erik Stern, Jackie, Joe and Brandon at Check-Mate Industries, the late Jacques Trausch and Tool Tech have personally contributed in the upgrades and improvements to mine).

    Best, Jon
    Last edited by JonInWA; 02-12-2019 at 02:29 PM.

  3. #83
    Member Johnny Walker's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by JonInWA View Post
    Latest update: With p-f member Jeep's suggestions and guidance, and after watching a YouTube segment twice on 92 slide disassembly, I just removed my extractor, firing pin block and firing pin, cleaning and re-lubricating as necessary, and replacing the OEM firing pin spring with one of Wilson Combat's chrome silicon firing pin spring. Here are the details, in all the glorious micro-detailed discussion that you guys have come to expect from me:

    Done Jeep-and thanks for the encouragement and guidance. Pretty straightforward, as you said. I annually remove, clean and re-spring my extractor (the re-springing part is as necessary, which is really probably never, but since Wilson Combat provided me with 2 flavors of their chrome silicon extractor springs {standard and +), last year I removed my OEM Beretta one for the heck of it, and used the standard weight Wilson Combat one-its running just fine).

    The firing pin block removal was very straightforward-just punch out the retaining roll pin with a 1/16th" roll pin punch, push down from the top (with a thumb on the rear of the firing pin to preclude it from launching into orbit), and it falls out (there's a small coil spring that tensions it, I removed it as well) and then pulled out the firing pin and firing pin spring (which was a little stubborn, and a Q-Tip was used to pull it out). While you could probably get away with using a flat 1/16th" punch, the roll pin punch both helps in the removal and re-installation process, and maintains the integrity of the roll pin itself, so using the right tools pays off-in this case the 2 sets of Lyman pistol maintenance punches (one standard flat, one roll-pin) I've invested in.

    All components were de-grunged, cleaned, and lightly lubed with Dri-Slide, a molybdenum disulfate dry film lubrication solution suspended in a liquid carrier-the liquid carrier solution evaporates, and you have an evenly deposited a dry lubricant film that lubricates without serving as a GSR magnet. The Beretta manual recommends a drop of lubricant applied to the firing pin hole at the breech and at the back of the firing pin where it projects from the back of the slide, but I much prefer the dry-film lubricant approach for theses assemblies.

    There really wasn't all that much accumulated on the firing pin, extractor and locking block, or in the firing pin, firing pin block and extractor chambers. It was worthwhile going in, but probably annually is sufficient for the extractor, and every couple of years for the firing pin/firing pin block. But since it's so easy on the D model, I'll probably just do the full meal deal annually.

    Despite that the OEM firing pin spring was running fine, since Wilson Combat had also graciously provided me with one of their chrome silicon firing pin springs, I replaced the OEM one with it (the Tech at BUSA that I spoke with yesterday said that he'd personally never seen or heard of an OEM firing pin spring breaking or losing tensility, but since I was already in there, I might as well just replace the original spring with a new one...). (And yes, I'm keeping the OEM one, just in case...).

    After reassembling everything, the extractor retaining pin needs to be re-staked (well, actually, it's the metal on the slide surrounding the extractor pin's hole that needs to be re-staked). Not much metal is required to be moved to accomplish this, and some 92 users have reported that the pin stays in place without re-staking, but I personally always do it. using a couple of hammer taps to a judiciously-placed small flat screwdriver blade, and then retouching with a dab of Birchwood Casey Black paint.

    Everytime I go into my Beretta 92, I'm reminded of the quality of the design and manufacturing that went into it. For example, when you re-insert the firing pin locking block and its spring, the firing pin nicely locks the assembly into place, making it easy to re-insert the roll pin used to secure it-no "three-handed drill" necessary (as compared to, say, replacing the extractor and firing pin stop on a 1911, especially a Series 80 firing pin safety on a 1911...). These are simply magnificently designed and manufactured pistols, and ones that we can thoroughly appreciate and use as designed. While my appreciation is more on the pragmatic side, it's is fun participating in the recent 92 Series Renaissance that seems to be occurring, and concurrently appreciating how Bill Wilson, Ernest Langdon and others are applying their efforts to tangibly improve the platform (and in how both Bill Wilson, Ernest Langdon, Erik Stern, Jackie, Joe and Brandon at Check-Mate Industries, the late Jacques Trausch and Tool Tech have personally contributed in the upgrades and improvements to mine).

    Best, Jon
    Jon

    Love the whole 92D series and I appreciate you keeping us all in the loop. Your work inspired me to bring out my '02 vintage 92D. I have given the old gal a bit of wilson/langdon love via new grips, springs, ditched the lanyard loop and installed Wilson mag guide, steel guide rod, etc. I love this thing~! Now thinking of the TJIB from LTT. I agree that once you delve into the gun its apparent the sound engineering and workmanship which went into the 92 design. I have reached out to Tool Tech for relamping my front sight.. I like the orange ring / tritium insert you have on your gun. With all the updated work, I may just run this one in IDPA at some point in the near future....Keep the updates flowing....
    Johnny Walker

  4. #84
    Member JonInWA's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Johnny Walker View Post
    Jon

    Love the whole 92D series and I appreciate you keeping us all in the loop. Your work inspired me to bring out my '02 vintage 92D. I have given the old gal a bit of wilson/langdon love via new grips, springs, ditched the lanyard loop and installed Wilson mag guide, steel guide rod, etc. I love this thing~! Now thinking of the TJIB from LTT. I agree that once you delve into the gun its apparent the sound engineering and workmanship which went into the 92 design. I have reached out to Tool Tech for relamping my front sight.. I like the orange ring / tritium insert you have on your gun. With all the updated work, I may just run this one in IDPA at some point in the near future....Keep the updates flowing....
    JW, Ernest's work is superb, but with the 92D, take a hard look at your LTT/Wilson Combat options. Arguably, all you need for a 92D is the WC triggerbar (it'll be a drop-in with the D), and the mainsprings to your liking-I'd suggest the 14# and 13#, at least to start with. With a D, you don't need the sear, sear spring, and the Elite II hammer (unless you want it). I'd give Ernest and Aimee a call, and see if he'll spec a D version TJIB for you.

    Other stuff you might want to add would be a set of LTT grips (unless you've already added, or are satisfied with the new grips you already added), and perhaps some of the other components I've discussed in the thread.

    Glad your enjoying and finding the updates helpful-feel welcome to ask any questions as they come up.

    Best, Jon

  5. #85
    Member Johnny Walker's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by JonInWA View Post
    JW, Ernest's work is superb, but with the 92D, take a hard look at your LTT/Wilson Combat options. Arguably, all you need for a 92D is the WC triggerbar (it'll be a drop-in with the D), and the mainsprings to your liking-I'd suggest the 14# and 13#, at least to start with. With a D, you don't need the sear, sear spring, and the Elite II hammer (unless you want it). I'd give Ernest and Aimee a call, and see if he'll spec a D version TJIB for you.

    Other stuff you might want to add would be a set of LTT grips (unless you've already added, or are satisfied with the new grips you already added), and perhaps some of the other components I've discussed in the thread.

    Glad your enjoying and finding the updates helpful-feel welcome to ask any questions as they come up.

    Best, Jon
    Thanks for the reply... truthfully, I was not interested in changing hammers at all. Figured the 14# mainspring and the stock hammer ought to get the job done. I love the slick slide of the 92D and the lack of hammer tail just further amplifies that fact. I once again have started CCWing this 92D since all the update work... before doing so I went out and shot 250 rounds thru it to make sure the work I did over the weekend was good to go... I did install the LTT thin grips and man they are the bomb. I have smaller hands so they did wonders for trigger reach and trigger pull geometry. I will ping you with questions if / when they arise. My plans now... after I do the modified TJIB I will jump into the slide and work there - firing pin, springs, extractor, etc. Thanks for posting this thread and for your reply. This is what makes PF "THE FORUM" to be a part of.
    Johnny Walker

  6. #86
    Member JonInWA's Avatar
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    Even though the reassembled 92D passed the "pencil test" (pencil inserted down barrel, eraser end first, pistol turned up vertically, trigger pulled, and seeing the pencil jump as proof of firing pin energy) with flying colors, I went to the range this morning and put 50 rounds downrange just to make sure all was truly good to go-particularly before used for duty/carry/defense. All good. And more accumulated tangible proof as to just how accurate and shootable the 92 is.

    Best, Jon

  7. #87
    I don't think DIVA posts here so go to the beretta froum and search for her. She is very enthusiastic about 92Ds and has at least a pair. She asked Ernest to do a TJIB for her and she is running an 11# hammer spring I believe. I can only get down to a 12# in my DA/SA B92s. The advantage the D has is the one piece firing pin vs two piece in FS or G. I believe that is what allows a further 1# reduction on the spring. From my recent experience w/ the NP3 version of the TJIB, I'd recommend asking Ernest to make up an NP3 kit for your D. I can pretty much assure that you will be amazed.

  8. #88
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    Quote Originally Posted by CraigS View Post
    I don't think DIVA posts here so go to the beretta froum and search for her. She is very enthusiastic about 92Ds and has at least a pair. She asked Ernest to do a TJIB for her and she is running an 11# hammer spring I believe. I can only get down to a 12# in my DA/SA B92s. The advantage the D has is the one piece firing pin vs two piece in FS or G. I believe that is what allows a further 1# reduction on the spring. From my recent experience w/ the NP3 version of the TJIB, I'd recommend asking Ernest to make up an NP3 kit for your D. I can pretty much assure that you will be amazed.
    That legitimately sounds amazing and makes me want to get into trouble with the wife by buying a used 92D Centurion that’s sitting at a gun shop I know...


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  9. #89
    "Zen Master" I guess... Bigghoss's Avatar
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    Just when I was thinking about selling my 92D's...
    Does anyone like pineapple on their pizza guns?

  10. #90
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    Quote Originally Posted by Bigghoss View Post
    Just when I was thinking about selling my 92D's...
    Based on my experience, Glocks and Beretta 92s are the two pistols that you probably shouldn’t ever sell because sooner or later you’re just going to come back to them.


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