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Thread: DIY trigger job for Beretta 92FS (not the D spring upgrade)

  1. #1

    DIY trigger job for Beretta 92FS (not the D spring upgrade)

    Is there anything you can do to further improve the Beretta 92FS trigger outside of installing a D spring? I have one installed and the trigger is much better than stock, but there's still a small amount of grit in the pull. Are there areas on the hammer or sear that you can easily polish yourself? How should I go about doing it without f-ing up the gun?

  2. #2
    We are diminished
    Join Date
    Feb 2011
    Yes, it can be polished. Ernest Langdon used to do outstanding -- and very inexpensive -- work on Beretta triggers. If he were still in business, he'd be the only way to go.

    But he's not, so I'd try the following easy solutions before moving metal:
    • Detail strip the gun and gently polish any action parts at any point where they show obvious wear from contact with other parts of the action.
    • Apply a good grease, like TW-25B, to all the friction points of the action.
    • Consider finding and using the "F" model hammer spring from a Cougar. It is lighter than the 92D spring. However, it may not last indefinitely. To be on the safe side, I'd probably replace it every 10k rounds if it's remaining reliable. If I could get a bag of them for cheap, I'd replace it every 5k rounds just to be on the safe side.

  3. #3
    Member
    Join Date
    Feb 2011
    Location
    Baltimore, MD
    Detail strip, clean, lube, and then shoot it a lot. Once I got the grime out of my 92FS, and started shooting it a lot, the trigger became noticeably smoother after a half dozen range trips.

    I'm not convinced the newer polymer coated trigger will get as smooth as the older steel trigger. The polymer coating inside the trigger where it pivots doesn't polish the way steel does. Or maybe it will just take a lot longer. My 92 with the polymer trigger has fewer rounds through it than my 92 with a steel trigger, so time will tell.

  4. #4
    Member TGS's Avatar
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    Apr 2011
    Location
    Bloombergia
    I couldn't tell the difference between the newer Beretta 92 with a polymer trigger that I owned and the well used Beretta M9's with steel triggers from work. I didn't even realize it was different until someone told me....it still had that nice, smooth Beretta action. A very pleasing pistol to shoot.
    "Are you ready? Okay. Let's roll."- Last words of Todd Beamer

  5. #5
    Member Suvorov's Avatar
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    Mar 2011
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    Occupied Kalifornia - SF Bay Area.
    Quote Originally Posted by TGS View Post
    I couldn't tell the difference between the newer Beretta 92 with a polymer trigger that I owned and the well used Beretta M9's with steel triggers from work. I didn't even realize it was different until someone told me....it still had that nice, smooth Beretta action. A very pleasing pistol to shoot.
    I have the same opinion. I picked up a 2008 Police Special from a friend who had decided to get out of the gun thing for crazy cheap a couple years ago and it was my first experience with a polymer part Beretta. It is a sweet shooting pistol, every bit as reliable and smooth as my older Berettas. Since I don't run the INS trigger return spring, the polymer trigger isn't an issue for me. If the polymer coated triggers do create grittiness, then my Jedi powers are not advanced enough to detect it.

    My 92Elite had what might be thought of as "grit" during the DA trigger pull. I took it apart to get a closer look and the "grit" was coming from some rough machining on the hammer/sear assembly which when pulled felt a little rough. I took a dremil too it, but only lightly hit the area paying careful attention to avoid the sear. It helped a little and now, at about 4000 rounds later, it is pretty smooth. The SA triggers I have shot have always been without any touch of grit.

  6. #6
    Member
    Join Date
    Feb 2011
    Location
    Baltimore, MD
    Quote Originally Posted by TGS View Post
    I couldn't tell the difference between the newer Beretta 92 with a polymer trigger that I owned and the well used Beretta M9's with steel triggers from work. I didn't even realize it was different until someone told me....it still had that nice, smooth Beretta action. A very pleasing pistol to shoot.
    That makes me hopeful that my newer 92 Compact with the polymer trigger will get as smooth as my well worn 92FS. The compact only has about 365 rounds through it, so we'll see how it progresses.

  7. #7
    I'm meh at best.
    Join Date
    Dec 2015
    Location
    Ohio
    Necro here - but good info.

    I went through my 92G last night and finally got the guts to go deeper besides polishing the hammer strut and deburring the trigger bar.

    Oh - my - gawd.

    I used this link for reference on where exactly to do the work, since it's what Wilson does. I also took the liberty of polishing the bottom of the 'ramp' of the slide that picks up a round (since it will drag on the top round in the mag under recoil), the sides of the sear that rub against the frame, flats of the hammer that rub against the frame, and the trigger bar where it rubs against the frame, grip, and stock. Tools used were Spyderco ceramic rods, and flat knife sharpening hones.

    https://www.1911addicts.com/threads/...nalysis.28446/

    The biggest thing is don't go crazy, just go until it's smooth. Do your best to avoid changing angles, which can be done by placing the hone on the flat part and moving it until you feel it 'settle', and keep that orientation - checking often.
    Try to keep your hones square to the surface, and don't use pressure to do the work. Let the hone do the work, your job is to keep things square.
    For the rounded parts like the round portion of the hammer, drag it radially - keep the SA hooks from contacting, and stop before the hammer halts on the legs on the backside.
    I dodn't mess with SA hooks on the sear or hammer, because I frankly don't think they need to be messed with. If you do mess with these, know that changing angles and depths can result in an unsafe firearm if done improperly.
    It's okay if you don't have a mirror finish, test your work often and see how things are improving. Stop when you're happy.
    Buy a spare parts kit from CDNN for $30 - it'll have duplicates of everything you could mess up and is cheap insurance. If you don't mess up now you have spares for when things wear out.

    Since the protective coating will be removed after doing this work, it's imperitive to keep things lubricated to prevent rust.


    All in all I thought my 92 had a great trigger pull after breaking the edges on the wilson trigger bar, polishing the hammer strut, and dropping the hammer spring to 14 pounds. I had no idea how smooth these guns could be with less than an hour's worth of work, and it's pretty simple overall.
    USAF E5 ~ Never settle for the ordinary.

    Rights cease to exist when restrictions are put on them

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