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Thread: Freedom Isn't Free and Neither Are Bullets... So I started reloading

  1. #1
    Member JCS's Avatar
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    Freedom Isn't Free and Neither Are Bullets... So I started reloading

    So I decided to start reloading.

    Recently I upgraded from a turret press to a Dillon 550b. I'm going to chronicle some loads I have tried and my process. I am mostly starting this to get input from others on issues I run into.

    Believe me, I have had quite a few issues along my reloading journey. Safety is always a priority. I'm super paranoid about squibs or double charges and my focus and attention stays directly on the powder level/charge in the cases. I have a pretty solid method now on the 550b that allows me to double check the powder levels to avoid the dreaded double charge.

    I am using Titegroup at the moment. Here's a couple loads I'm using.

    • Reloading press used (list modifications if relevant):
      Dillon 550b w/ inline Fab light
    • Caliber:
      9mm
    • Bullet (Weight, Coating, Profile, Manufacturer):
      147 grain coated Bayou Bullets. I've tried the red and purpleish coating
    • Powder manufacturer, type and charge; volume, type (ball, stick, flake):
      Hogdon Titegroup 3.3 grains avg. (10 charges was 33.4 grns)
    • Dies used:
      All Dillon except the Crimp die is a Lee FCD. This has taken my CG failures from around 10% to 1-2%
    • Primers used:
      CCI
    • Cartridge Overall Length (COAL):
      appx. 1.125-1.130
    • Chronograph data (if possible):
      none
    • Goals intended with this load:
      Plinking load and USPSA Minor load
    • Results - accuracy, smokiness, clean burning, flash, temperature, smell, brass deformation, etc.:
      There is smoke. I don't have alot to compare it to but it doesn't bother me outdoors. In fact I don't really notice it except on video.
    • Problems encountered and fixes applied:
      These shoot very well out of a Glock 34. I need to do more testing out of my other guns. I really only intend to shoot this round in the G34.
    • Anything of interest:
    "We don't rise to the level of our expectations, we FALL to the level of our training"- Archilochus

  2. #2
    Member JCS's Avatar
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    One of the great things about reloading is you can choose any bullet you want. It's also one of the worst because it's hard to choose and find time to test them all.


    Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
    "We don't rise to the level of our expectations, we FALL to the level of our training"- Archilochus

  3. #3
    Site Supporter TCFD273's Avatar
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    I run 147's w/titegroup as well. Right now I have several thousand Winchester primers, usually switch between Winchester or CCI.
    Recently picked up 1k rounds of SNS Castings 147, and I'm very impressed with their coating so far.


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  4. #4
    Site Supporter Bill Nesbitt's Avatar
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    I ran this exact load over the chronograph the other day. 147 Bayou, 3.3 Titegroup, 1.125 COAL, WW primers gave an average velocity of 930 with a power factor of 137.

    My main practice/IDPA load is 3.2 of Titegroup (average of 10 throws is 3.16) with everything else the same. 911 FPS, PF 134. I've probably shot 20,000 rounds of this load in Glocks, CZ's and others.

    This is through a Gen 4 G-17. Your G-34 probably gives a little more velocity.

  5. #5
    Member JCS's Avatar
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    I ran into an issue with the Dillon seating die and coated flat point bullets.

    The hole in the flat part of the seating stem is creating a halo effect on top and rubbing off the coating in a circular shape on the rounds.

    I temporarily switched it around to the round nose side to load the flat point Bayou's but it's not giving me as consistent of an oal.
    Considering the popularity of Dillon presses and flat point Bullets I can't be the only one to experience this.

    Any tips?

    I'm pretty disappointed in Dillon dies so far.

    Seems like I need to get a different seating die if I want to keep running flat point bullets.


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    "We don't rise to the level of our expectations, we FALL to the level of our training"- Archilochus

  6. #6
    A rub in the coating on the nose will not affect the shooting.

    If it annoys you, you could try the old trick of glass bedding the seating plug to your bullet. If you mean to stay with that bullet.
    Code Name: JET STREAM

  7. #7
    Member JCS's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Jim Watson View Post
    A rub in the coating on the nose will not affect the shooting.

    If it annoys you, you could try the old trick of glass bedding the seating plug to your bullet. If you mean to stay with that bullet.
    Here is a picture of the rounds the sides of the bullets are fine. It's just the top. Since I shoot out of a stock Glock I didn't know if that could lead to leading.


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    "We don't rise to the level of our expectations, we FALL to the level of our training"- Archilochus

  8. #8
    That will not cause leading.

    It IS pretty ugly, though.
    First, look at the seating plug. It has a hole in it to bleed off bullet lube, where present in excess. Look to see if there is a burr around the hole. If there is, smooth it out. If not, bed the plug or replace the die.

    Me?
    I use Hornady seating dies with micro stem because I got tired of trying to adjust seating with the coarse loose die body threads, which is all you have to work with on the Dillon seating die.
    Code Name: JET STREAM

  9. #9
    Member JCS's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Jim Watson View Post
    That will not cause leading.

    It IS pretty ugly, though.
    First, look at the seating plug. It has a hole in it to bleed off bullet lube, where present in excess. Look to see if there is a burr around the hole. If there is, smooth it out. If not, bed the plug or replace the die.

    Me?
    I use Hornady seating dies with micro stem because I got tired of trying to adjust seating with the coarse loose die body threads, which is all you have to work with on the Dillon seating die.
    The hole is smooth and does not have any burrs.

    I found this article about modifying the stem with hot glue or jb weld. http://www.uniquetek.com/store/69629...tomization.pdf

    I may try this.

    How does the hornady seating die and micro stem work with flat point bullets?


    Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
    "We don't rise to the level of our expectations, we FALL to the level of our training"- Archilochus

  10. #10
    Yes, that is the sort of thing I meant by "glass bedding" the seating plug.

    I'll have to go look,
    tick tock
    The Hornady seater plugs are drilled out so deep that they contact the bullet on the ogive, not the tip.
    I find that I had reamed the 9mm plug to a taper that would not leave a ring around the nose of a plated bullet.
    The .45 plug is stock and does not mark a coated or cast bullet.
    Code Name: JET STREAM

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