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Thread: Torque Wrench

  1. #1
    Notorious Derp Merchant
    Join Date
    Nov 2011
    Location
    Brooklyn NY

    Torque Wrench

    I heard about "Wheeler Firearms Accurizing Torque Wrench"
    "FAT Wrench"
    and I though it would make a good gift to my Kitchen table gunsmith.
    It is a Torque wrench for small jobs including scope rings
    (torque adjustment range from 10 to 65 inch pounds).



    https://www.amazon.com/Wheeler-Firearms-Accurizing-Torque-Wrench/dp/B0012AXR4S
    I see these discussed on various firearms blogs and they seem like a good idea.
    I liked the idea but the reviews were poor.


    So I researched
    better rated one, the: Borka Tools adjustable torque driver (ATD)
    available at: http://www.shooterstools.com/
    It looks like a really neat design.




    I have no review as I gave it as a gift. when we use it I will let you
    all know. Just wanted to start a thread in case people who actually
    use tools had something intelligent to add.







  2. #2
    Site Supporter
    Join Date
    Mar 2012
    Location
    NE Washington
    Tagged for interest. I got a FAT and think it is OK. I am Johnny Overtorque and would be interested in other options.

  3. #3
    I have a FAT, worked fine for installing a flashlight and micro mount.

    Sent from my ONEPLUS A3000 using Tapatalk

  4. #4
    Site Supporter Bill Nesbitt's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2011
    Location
    Ohio
    I recently got one of the Wheeler FAT wrenches. I've used it maybe a dozen times. It has worked fine for me. I always relieve the pressure before I put it away.

    I was amazed how little torque is needed for the small stuff. I have way over tightened a bunch of stuff over the years.

  5. #5
    I have been using the same FAT for about 10 years installing scope rings and bases mounts. Seems to work OK. However, just as Bill, I always relive the pressure (i.e. set it to 0) before storage.

  6. #6
    Member
    Join Date
    Dec 2011
    Location
    Cincinnati Ohio
    I, too, have FAT wrench that seems to work very well.
    I have a Leopold 2-12x40 VX-6 on my .300 win mag hunting rifle and was having trouble moving the magnification ring.
    Contacted Leopold and the very helpful gentleman told me before I send it back to try loosening the scope rings to see if that might cure the problem. He thought I might have them so tight as to distort the scope tube making it hard to move the mag ring.
    Well, like others here I tend to over torque those little screws. Loosening and torqueing properly solved the problem.
    I have since gone to all of my other scoped rifles and properly torqued the base screws and rings.
    While I was at it I carefully leveled them and reset the eye relief.
    Like others here said I was surprised at how little 28 inch pounds is.
    The FAT wrench also accepts all of the Wheeler bits that are in their line.
    And, as has been said, any torque wrench should be set back to zero for storage.
    Very handy tool to have around.
    Dean,
    “The duty of a patriot is to protect his country from its government.” - Thomas Paine

    “What doesn’t kill you makes you stronger. Except bears. Bears will kill you.” - My Wife

  7. #7
    I had a FAT for years. It went away as soon as I switched to a Borka, about 5 years ago. I now have a few different Borka. Nothing better, imo. I've had Seekonk and stuff like that as well.
    Easily concealable with no sporting purpose.

  8. #8
    Supporting Business
    Join Date
    Feb 2013
    Location
    Youngstown, OH
    What most people don't do with their adjustable torque wrenches is exercise them.

    As mentioned, they should always be returned to their lowest setting. Not past the lowest, not completely un screwed, the lowest designed setting. Then after setting to the desired torque, you should "exercise" the wrench by clicking it several times on a static screw or bolt. This ensures that the internal springs are all properly set.

    They should also be calibrated periodically but I know of no one other than the Military and laboratory facilities that actually send their torque wrenches out for calibration. I know I've never had any of mine calibrated and haven't had any issues with my vehicles or scopes.

    BTW, I use the cheaper FAT Wrench on for all my firearm needs. The Borka tools are far superior but I've had good results from the Wheeler tools
    Last edited by Rich@CCC; 01-12-2017 at 11:35 AM.
    TANSTAAFL

    Managing Partner, Custom Carry Concepts, LLC

  9. #9
    I agree with everything Rich wrote. The nice thing about the borka is that it doesn't need calibration.
    Easily concealable with no sporting purpose.

  10. #10
    Member
    Join Date
    Jan 2017
    Location
    Farminton Hills, MI
    Quote Originally Posted by Rich@CCC View Post
    What most people don't do with their adjustable torque wrenches is exercise them.

    As mentioned, they should always be returned to their lowest setting. Not past the lowest, not completely un screwed, the lowest designed setting. Then after setting to the desired torque, you should "exercise" the wrench by clicking it several times on a static screw or bolt. This ensures that the internal springs are all properly set.

    They should also be calibrated periodically but I know of no one other than the Military and laboratory facilities that actually send their torque wrenches out for calibration. I know I've never had any of mine calibrated and haven't had any issues with my vehicles or scopes.

    BTW, I use the cheaper FAT Wrench on for all my firearm needs. The Borka tools are far superior but I've had good results from the Wheeler tools
    This is a good post, and an interesting observation about calibration. The main reason that company and government labs or production facilities periodically calibrate their torque tools is the formal requirement to have a fresh calibration sticker (every year or two) in order to pass various forms of audits, imposed either by the government regulations or QS (ISO, etc.) rules and regulations.

    For production line tools, periodic calibration also makes sense because of the very large number of torque application cycles, which may cause change in torque output due to some wear of torque limiting clutch.

    However, for individual users, who will never apply tens of thousands of torque applications cycles, compliance with formal audits schedules and being concerned about periodical calibration makes no practical sense, unless tool is so low quality, that it may loose its settings real fast.

    Low quality typically comes from use of substandard materials and compression springs, which can take a set after some period of time being left compressed to near solid height. As a general rule, very inexpensive torque tools are more likely to demonstrate these issues after some period of time.

    Audit related periodic calibration is applicable not just to lab or production torque tools, but to just about any other tools of any importance, like calipers, micrometers, etc. It has to be done, even if tools are not used at all, to simply show that the formal rules are observed and to pass an audit.
    Last edited by kortik; 01-15-2017 at 11:05 AM.

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