Page 5 of 5 FirstFirst ... 345
Results 41 to 46 of 46

Thread: Any benefit to a "recoil training pistol"?

  1. #41
    Member DocSabo40's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2015
    Location
    Peoria, AZ
    Lots of good discussion here. I especially like the part about using hotter ammo for practice. A buddy of mine tried my 229 loaded with HST 147 +p and remarked how heavy the recoil was. I suggested that he try the ammo that was currently in his Glock (HST 124gr) and he was, again, surprised at the recoil. He hadn't shot his carry ammo in months and trains with low powered ammo. He had a different solution than me though: he dropped the HST and started carrying a lighter recoiling load, I think the Barnes 115gr.

    As far as the new blaster goes: Keith over at DW came up with a brilliant (and more expensive) solution. He is just going to build my new 1911 in .45 and then build me another complete, matching upper in 9mm.

  2. #42
    Member randyflycaster's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2016
    Location
    Missoula, MT
    Quote Originally Posted by Paul Sharp View Post
    but grip it harder in the right places while directing pressure in the optimal directions is better advice. Most folks learn that through a series of kinesthetically learning based exercises.
    Can you please elaborate on this. What exactly are the right places to apply grip pressure?

    Thanks,
    Randy

  3. #43
    Site Supporter Paul Sharp's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2014
    Location
    Illinois

    Any benefit to a "recoil training pistol"?

    Quote Originally Posted by randyflycaster View Post
    Can you please elaborate on this. What exactly are the right places to apply grip pressure?

    Thanks,
    Randy
    1) Bottom of the front strap. That's the part that wants to lift on recoil.

    2) Top of the back strap as close to the slide as possible.

    Squeezing the side panels plays a role but not a primary role. If you set the brakes on a truck it will still have some creep. Throw a set of chocks around the tires and it won't move. It we chock the bottom of the front strap and top of the back strap, which is where the gun lifts and pivots, we'll minimize movement. Only relying on grip pressure on the side panels is like only relying on the calipers and pads to grip the brakes.
    Last edited by Paul Sharp; 01-06-2017 at 02:06 PM.
    "There is magic in misery. You need to constantly fail. Always bite off more than you can chew, put yourself in situations where you don't succeed then really analyze why you didn't succeed." - Dean Karnazes www.sbgillinois.com

  4. #44
    Member randyflycaster's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2016
    Location
    Missoula, MT
    Paul,
    Thanks so much. I hear so much about grip pressure, but few folks describe how they apply it.
    Randy

  5. #45
    Site Supporter Paul Sharp's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2014
    Location
    Illinois
    Quote Originally Posted by randyflycaster View Post
    Paul,
    Thanks so much. I hear so much about grip pressure, but few folks describe how they apply it.
    Randy
    You're welcome, hope it helps.
    "There is magic in misery. You need to constantly fail. Always bite off more than you can chew, put yourself in situations where you don't succeed then really analyze why you didn't succeed." - Dean Karnazes www.sbgillinois.com

  6. #46
    Member
    Join Date
    Mar 2015
    Location
    Central Virginia
    Quote Originally Posted by 1776United View Post
    On the flip side I have been shooting a lot of reloads. I didn't realize how much less recoil they had than my carry ammo. I shot some of my carry ammo and it felt like a different caliber.

    I think I need to work up a load that mimics my carry stuff.
    Try BE-86 powder if you want to duplicate service/carry ammo velocity and recoil. I have successfully done so with .40 180 grain loads and 124 grain +P 9mm.

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •  

TLG 1970–2016 RIPRampageForTheCure.org