View Poll Results: What is the largest CoC you can close with either hand individually?

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  • Guide ("G"): 60 lbs

    0 0%
  • Sport ("S"): 80 lbs

    2 3.28%
  • Trainer ("T"): 100 lbs

    9 14.75%
  • Point Five: 120 lbs

    4 6.56%
  • No. 1: 140 lbs

    14 22.95%
  • No. 1.5: 167.5 lbs

    14 22.95%
  • No. 2: 195 lbs

    13 21.31%
  • No 2.5: 237.5 lbs

    5 8.20%
  • No. 3: 280 lbs

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Thread: Captains of Crush Grippers: What's your grip strength?

  1. #21
    Quote Originally Posted by GJM View Post
    Some folks mention grip strength as relates to recoil control, but I think that is secondary to the benefit of a good grip allowing you to press the trigger faster without disturbing the sights. TGO explains how you can shoot Alphas with a terrible grip -- you just can't press the trigger very fast. Pressing the trigger fast and making good hits requires a strong grip.
    I agree

    I'm not a fan of the CoC grippers personally as I've seen people injure themselves. I'm a fan of "farmer carry" exercises with heavy dumbbells.

    That's just a quibble.

  2. #22
    Site Supporter Paul Sharp's Avatar
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    The cool thing about strength is the there is a 'raising all ships' type of effect. I have shared with a few people my first time in a dedicated strength gym. Everyone was a strongman, highland games, or powerlifting competitor It's an invite only gym and I was fortunate to be invited. My first night was a bench night. I was thrown in with guys in my weight class and we started benching with them coaching me. They're 3rd or 4th warmup set was my 5 rep max... While they were able to warmup with 135, 225, 315, and 405 on their way up to their work sets, I was trashed and tapping out. Because their absolute strength was so great they were able to cruise through weights that weaker athletes struggle with. This applies to grip strength as well. Guys with great grip strength don't have to work as hard to grip the gun tightly. What was formerly their 100% effort is now only 70% effort because their absolute threshold has been pushed so far. They can get the same or better results with less effort simply because they are stronger.
    Last edited by Paul Sharp; 11-19-2016 at 02:01 AM.
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  3. #23
    Grip strength and shooting. If it were only that simple. Things to consider: crushing versus pinching, contraction vs static hold, fast twitch vs slow twitch.

    My current position on grip strength and shooting.

    I do believe grip strength and grip work play a part in shooting. There is a baseline level of grip strength that will cover shooting. Probably somewhere in the CoC #1-1.5 range. Not a one rep max at this level but this should be a "working set" level, somewhere between 10-20 reps. In other words, this would be your walking around crushing grip strength that can be done at anytime. I also believe that just as much is gained from grippers in the area of "muscle awareness" and/or "muscle recruitment". For me, grippers seem to enhance my awareness of all of my fingers when gripping and this carries over to the handgun. It increases my awareness of proprioceptive feedback and enhances my response, both voluntary and involuntary.

  4. #24
    Site Supporter JHC's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Jay Cunningham View Post
    I agree

    I'm not a fan of the CoC grippers personally as I've seen people injure themselves. I'm a fan of "farmer carry" exercises with heavy dumbbells.

    That's just a quibble.
    And fat bar training?

    To anyone?
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  5. #25
    I'd like to clarify that I don't have a problem with the CoC grippers but guys seem to get weirdly obsessed with them, which leads to overdoing it.

    I think general weight training involving barbells and dumbbells improves overall grip. Pick up heavy stuff and hold onto it!

  6. #26
    Member John Hearne's Avatar
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    While it stops at 200 lb, Amazon has an inexpensive dynamometer to measure grip strength. They were recently on sale for less than $21 so I picked one up. Karl Rehn has convinced me to look at grip strength when teaching new shooters or diagnosing bad ones. Link: https://www.amazon.com/Digital-Dynam...ds=dynamometer

    My grip strength is 116 lbs in each hand measured in the "proper" position (humerus parallel with torso, forearm perpendicular to the ground) and 124 when at extension (like I'm shooting.) I was surprised that my strength is pretty much identical in each hand. I have one of the "heavy" Grip Masters which is 11 lb per finger that I use occasionally. I've been deadlifting a lot more in the past 12-18 months.
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  7. #27

    Captains of Crush Grippers: What's your grip strength?

    I warmup with T and push to failure with #1. Haven't bought a #2 yet. I only work them about once a week after hearing about Mr. White's injury. Back when I first started climbing, I was trying to squeeze everything as hard as I could. It gave me flash pumps and tore up my elbows pretty badly. Not fun. A couple years later when my muscles AND tendons had been seasoned, I realized just how limited I'd been by grip strength because that was my bottleneck. It may or may not make a big difference for you to be able to squeeze the ever living shit out of things for one rep but once you establish really strong tendons, it reduces your chance of injury when pushing yourself and removes one limiter to performance gains. So, even if you don't do it often, don't stop.

    ETA: not a doctor
    Last edited by BobLoblaw; 11-19-2016 at 08:15 AM.
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  8. #28
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    Quote Originally Posted by GJM View Post
    Some folks mention grip strength as relates to recoil control, but I think that is secondary to the benefit of a good grip allowing you to press the trigger faster without disturbing the sights. TGO explains how you can shoot Alphas with a terrible grip -- you just can't press the trigger very fast. Pressing the trigger fast and making good hits requires a strong grip.
    Lots of truth here for me. And it can be gun specific, at least for me. For the same level of performance and consistency, I need to grip a Glock harder than a SIG. I'm not talking about recoil control, but in my ability to manipulate the trigger without disturbing the sights.

    And to add.....I wonder how much grip strength is used to compensate for a pistol grip that doesn't really fit the individual?
    Last edited by LSP552; 11-19-2016 at 08:42 AM.

  9. #29
    ne'er-do-well blues's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by JHC View Post
    And fat bar training?

    To anyone?
    My 85 lb olympic shrug bar has over sized handles which are great for grip work. My standard 45 lb olympic shrug bar has, well, standard diameter grips.

    BTW, I sold my set of CoC grippers and enjoy using the Ivanko Super Gripper in their place.
    "The writer's job is to tell the truth." - Ernest Hemingway

  10. #30
    Member John Hearne's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by LSP552 View Post
    And to add.....I wonder how much grip strength is used to compensate for a pistol grip that doesn't really fit the individual?
    A LOT. Seriously, I've been reading old shooting books and they are very adamant that the gun must fit your hand properly. If it doesn't fit get another gun is the standard line. By fit they mean that the interaction of the grip/hand makes it easy to press the trigger straight back.

    In a chapter on selecting grips they discuss a right hander shooting to the left. What do they offer as an explanation? Shooting a grip that is too large. Where do Glock shooters tend to throw shots? What is the commonly accepted fix for this - sink more trigger finger which has the effect of pulling the gun back to the right.

    I see super amounts of grip strength as a crutch to fix this issue. If you can increase the pressure of the "vise" holding the gun, you can minimize deflection of the gun caused by actuation of the trigger. Is this an effective solution - yes as it fixes the problem but, maybe not having the problem in the first place might be a better solution.

    My personal opinion is that we've become so fixated on capacity that we neglect and sacrifice shooting well. I would offer that a lot of folks are shooting guns that are too large for their hand. They would shoot better, and need less ammo, if they actually had a gun that fit their hand.

    "Enough" is a relative term. I carried a revolver as a duty gun and BUG for my first seven years. Going to an 8+1 gun was a 50% increase in capacity and the auto reloads much faster than the revolver. Having "just" 9 rounds means a lot less to me by way of perspective than those raised on plastic framed, striker fired guns.

    Incidentally, the other factor mentioned in the old books is weight. Heavier guns are seen as superior to lighter guns. A lot of this has to do with additional mass resisting deflection when actuating the trigger. The extra mass also has the effect of reducing felt recoil. I've done some side by side shooting with my alloy frame Sigs versus steel frame Sigs and the difference is very obvious. I'm faster and more accurate with the gun that has an extra 12 oz.
    • It's not the odds, it's the stakes.
    • If you aren't dry practicing every week, you're not serious.....
    • "Tache-Psyche Effect - a polite way of saying 'You suck.' " - GG

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