View Poll Results: What is the largest CoC you can close with either hand individually?

Voters
59. You may not vote on this poll
  • Guide ("G"): 60 lbs

    0 0%
  • Sport ("S"): 80 lbs

    2 3.39%
  • Trainer ("T"): 100 lbs

    9 15.25%
  • Point Five: 120 lbs

    4 6.78%
  • No. 1: 140 lbs

    14 23.73%
  • No. 1.5: 167.5 lbs

    14 23.73%
  • No. 2: 195 lbs

    11 18.64%
  • No 2.5: 237.5 lbs

    5 8.47%
  • No. 3: 280 lbs

    0 0%
  • No. 3.5: 322.5 lbs

    0 0%
  • No. 4: 365 lbs

    0 0%
Page 9 of 9 FirstFirst ... 789
Results 81 to 89 of 89

Thread: Captains of Crush Grippers: What's your grip strength?

  1. #81
    Quote Originally Posted by Slalom.45 View Post
    As a PT by trade I would think tendonitis issues would be caused by overuse. These are far heavier than the grippers we use in a rehab setting. Low reps and moderate frequency is my plan.
    Tendonitis is a real concern, and you surely have the right avoidance program. Regarding the CoC grippers, when I do up to 5 sets of 5 reps twice a week, there is no tendonitis. For me, raising the sets or the reps or the frequency above those numbers results in tendonitis.

    Keeping grip work to twice a week sessions of 5 of 5 means I can move to the next stronger gripper after about 30 exercise sessions (15 weeks or so).

  2. #82
    Anyone have any tips or warnings for using the extensor bands? What sort of program have people followed for those?

    Right now I'm not using any grippers, I'm just relying on strength training and dryfire, but I use the extensor bands for a ~3 sets of 12 after dryfire everyday or after a grip intensive workout at the gym. I do a set with a warmup resistance then another 2-3 sets with a working resistance. Sometimes I'll do a few final reps with a higher resistance or do a isometric hold to wrap things up.

  3. #83
    I used to use the bands very regularly, and then I injured my hands last year in an unrelated way. As I built my strength back up, I failed to use the bands. I just re injured my hands last week, and my grip strength is noticeably down. Looks like I need to go back to the bands and not forget... I'm not saying the bands would have prevented injury, but I think they do a good job of balancing things out to be safer. Also, I find a warm up to be essential now, and I've been skipping that lately. I think that has a lot to do with me reinjuring them.
    Easily concealable with no sporting purpose.

  4. #84
    "Not So Much" blues's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2016
    Location
    Smoky's Holler
    Quote Originally Posted by dove View Post
    Anyone have any tips or warnings for using the extensor bands? What sort of program have people followed for those?

    Right now I'm not using any grippers, I'm just relying on strength training and dryfire, but I use the extensor bands for a ~3 sets of 12 after dryfire everyday or after a grip intensive workout at the gym. I do a set with a warmup resistance then another 2-3 sets with a working resistance. Sometimes I'll do a few final reps with a higher resistance or do a isometric hold to wrap things up.
    Quote Originally Posted by SLG View Post
    I used to use the bands very regularly, and then I injured my hands last year in an unrelated way. As I built my strength back up, I failed to use the bands. I just re injured my hands last week, and my grip strength is noticeably down. Looks like I need to go back to the bands and not forget... I'm not saying the bands would have prevented injury, but I think they do a good job of balancing things out to be safer. Also, I find a warm up to be essential now, and I've been skipping that lately. I think that has a lot to do with me reinjuring them.
    Before I begin my weight training sessions I warm up with rotator cuff exercises and some grip work via hanging off a chinning bar as discussed (as I recall) earlier in this thread.

    At the end of each session I do grip work via the Ivanko Super Gripper, a forearm / wrist roller device and lastly with the IronMind bands. I always try to use the gripper and bands in balance with each other much as I try to do a pulling movement for every pushing movement with the weights.

    As someone who has had some on again / off again nagging issues with forearms and elbows (epicondylitis), this has really worked wonderfully well for me...first as rehab, now as prevention. I rarely (knock on wood) get plagued with these issues unless I have to overuse a joint due to a long day of shoveling, chopping, sledge hammering etc.

    With the bands I'll usually just do a few sets of 15 or so...with the thumb included and sometimes only with the four fingers. Just work until I feel the extensors fatiguing.
    “Tactics without strategy is the noise before defeat.” - Sun Tzu // "Everybody has a plan until they get punched in the mouth." - Mike Tyson

  5. #85
    Okay, sounds like I'm using them similarly.

    I only ask because there's a dialogue that the tendonitis is due to some sort of flexor/extensor imbalance and that working the extensors with the bands prevents it. Meanwhile, there's another dialogue which is that the tendonitis is from overuse. I don't really see how the extensor bands undo use, and I was wondering if anyone experienced any overuse problems from working too frequently with the bands.

    I'm definitely using the bands a lot more than people say to use the grippers, and the plain truth is that the bands are using something.

  6. #86
    Quote Originally Posted by dove View Post

    I only ask because there's a dialogue that the tendonitis is due to some sort of flexor/extensor imbalance and that working the extensors with the bands prevents it. Meanwhile, there's another dialogue which is that the tendonitis is from overuse.
    Personally, I don't think the flexor/extensor argument is supportable. The hands are designed to flex. The extensors are there only as a courtesy so the hand can be used more than once. Resisting nature by trying to balance the flexors against the extensors would seem unlikely to succeed because they simply don't have the same mass: the palm side of the forearm has more muscles than the top.

    On the other hand, the overuse argument has an empirical appeal. As posted earlier, I've found that overworking CoC grippers really encourages tendonitis.

  7. #87
    "Not So Much" blues's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2016
    Location
    Smoky's Holler
    Quote Originally Posted by Duces Tecum View Post
    Personally, I don't think the flexor/extensor argument is supportable. The hands are designed to flex. The extensors are there only as a courtesy so the hand can be used more than once. Resisting nature by trying to balance the flexors against the extensors would seem unlikely to succeed because they simply don't have the same mass: the palm side of the forearm has more muscles than the top.

    On the other hand, the overuse argument has an empirical appeal. As posted earlier, I've found that overworking CoC grippers really encourages tendonitis.
    DT, I would only like to recommend that you try it before you throw it out as a viable technique to help mitigate and reduce overuse injuries. Simple and inexpensive enough to try out just using simple rubber bands, inner tubes etc cut to the right size and width.

    I don't think that the two sets of muscles would ever be equivalent in strength, it's just that they seem to support the system better when the extensors aren't neglected. Anyway, I can only speak from my own personal experience over a number of years rock climbing, lifting weights, and participating in various athletic endeavors.

    I grant you that YMMV.
    “Tactics without strategy is the noise before defeat.” - Sun Tzu // "Everybody has a plan until they get punched in the mouth." - Mike Tyson

  8. #88
    Member
    Join Date
    May 2016
    Location
    Dallas
    Quote Originally Posted by dove View Post
    Okay, sounds like I'm using them similarly.

    I only ask because there's a dialogue that the tendonitis is due to some sort of flexor/extensor imbalance and that working the extensors with the bands prevents it. Meanwhile, there's another dialogue which is that the tendonitis is from overuse. I don't really see how the extensor bands undo use, and I was wondering if anyone experienced any overuse problems from working too frequently with the bands.

    I'm definitely using the bands a lot more than people say to use the grippers, and the plain truth is that the bands are using something.
    A strong crush grip is impressive because of how rare they are and how hard they are to develop.

    Traditionally the people with the strong grips do manual labor and usually start at a young age (usually it's support grip and pinch grip). That grip isn't something that happened over night or in a gym twice a week, it's decades of hard work. Playing with heavy grippers is getting to that strong grip end goal in a hurry, but skipping out on paying dues. IMO this is why most people end up with problems when they work with heavy grippers. Tendons and ligaments adapt, grow, and repair at a snails pace compared to muscles. You can develop the muscle for a strong grip in a very short period of time, your tendons will need years of consistent work to develop. You can mitigate and reduce some of the impact of grippers with flexbars and bands, but if you're not building off of that base of years hard work, you're probably going to have problems. Personally I think tendonitis with grippers is an undevelopment problem not an overuse one, or it's overuse of underdeveloped tendons.

    If your worried about developing or aggravating tendonitis with grippers, it's probably best to just leave the heavy grippers alone. You can build a strong support and pinch grip, that will carryover to a respectable crush grip, with a lot less risk.

    Bob Vogel is not a great shooter because he has a superhuman crush grip. He's great because he's disciplined and he's always looking for a way to take his game to the next level. He's spent years refining his craft and paying his dues, what makes him great is that he doesn't stop and settle. If he had an average grip he'd still find a way to be great. He grew up on a farm, that should be a clue about when his grip "training" started.
    Last edited by txdpd; 01-16-2017 at 11:57 PM.
    <---Not very articulate.

  9. #89
    Member
    Join Date
    Sep 2011
    Location
    CT (behind Enemy lines)
    Sorry my bad posted here in error.
    Last edited by JohnO; 01-21-2017 at 02:03 PM.

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •  

TLG 1970–2016 RIPRampageForTheCure.org