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Thread: Beretta introducing a Langdon Tactical 92!

  1. #1621
    Quote Originally Posted by AdioSS View Post
    Definitely NOT taking away from Mr Langdon, but that sure does look a LOT like that trigger bar from the 92X...



    ...which actually strongly resembles the trigger bar design of the original 92
    It is very much like that system. It is the same concept and it has been known that you could do this since the 92SB, the first 92 with a firing pin block. For a few reasons, Beretta decided not to do this in the production guns. I am not exactly sure why, but something about someone falling with their finger on the trigger, after they fired a shot, and the finger still pressed to the rear. Now the firing pin block would not be engaged and the gun could fire. If they left their finger on the trigger, pressed to the rear, after they fired a shot?!?!?!

    I have yet to see a production 92X, much less take one apart. So I really don't know exactly how they ended up making the system work in that gun. I did see a prototype last year and I got to play with one at the NRA convention in April. It took care of over travel with the trigger and set screws in the frame I believe.

    The big question is are they going to make the Xtream trigger bars the same way they make the standard trigger bars. If so, they will have issues with that cast part that is the current trigger bar. It tends to degrade the DA pull over time with the part starts to wear, as many on this forum have discussed in the past. The part I am having made is way too expensive to make for a production gun, or at least at a price the market will accept.

    The whole reason we designed the Wilson Trigger bar to start with is to take care of multiple issues with one part. That keeps the cost down and makes it work regardless of which trigger you use. Steel, polymer, stainless, short reach...... it does not matter which trigger, the Trigger Bar solves the problem of over travel. Also, it solves the issue of the hitch in the DA pull that you get with the new factory cast trigger bars, or in some cases, an early hammer drop in DA from a worn trigger bar. Now we have added in the Short Reset as well and an even harder, slicker finish on the trigger bar.
    www.langdontactical.com
    Bellator,Doctus,Armatus

  2. #1622
    Quote Originally Posted by Bucky View Post
    Does the new trigger bar reduce the amount of trigger return?

    What do you mean by "trigger return"? Do you mean total movement forward, or distance to reset?

    With a standard trigger bar, when the trigger resets, you still have to move the trigger back quite a bit to prep the trigger and contact the sear. With the OP Trigger Bar, when you reset, you are already prepped.
    www.langdontactical.com
    Bellator,Doctus,Armatus

  3. #1623
    Member AdioSS's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2014
    Location
    East Texas
    @LangdonTactical Thank you for the reply!

    I read a post about you taking the trigger bar out of someoneís 92 at a class & heating it to harden the DA notch. Iíve done that with several of my Trigger bars since. Obviously it isnít the same as starting with a bar that is done properly right off the bat.

  4. #1624
    Quote Originally Posted by LangdonTactical View Post
    What do you mean by "trigger return"? Do you mean total movement forward, or distance to reset?

    With a standard trigger bar, when the trigger resets, you still have to move the trigger back quite a bit to prep the trigger and contact the sear. With the OP Trigger Bar, when you reset, you are already prepped.
    Yes, I mean the movement the trigger moves forward when released. Some short resets donít eliminate the trigger travel. For those that ďride the searĒ / only release enough trigger to reset, that short reset works great. For those that completely release the trigger, the reset doesnít matter as much, if the trigger travel is the same.

    For terminology sake, to me, reset is how far forward you need to release the trigger before you are able to fire the next shot, and the return being how much the trigger moves forward when completely released.

    For example, a Glock has a short reset, but a longer return (if you fully release the trigger after each shot).

    By your description, it sounds like the trigger moves less further forward.

  5. #1625
    Member
    Join Date
    Nov 2018
    Location
    West TX
    Quote Originally Posted by LangdonTactical View Post
    It is very much like that system. It is the same concept and it has been known that you could do this since the 92SB, the first 92 with a firing pin block. For a few reasons, Beretta decided not to do this in the production guns. I am not exactly sure why, but something about someone falling with their finger on the trigger, after they fired a shot, and the finger still pressed to the rear. Now the firing pin block would not be engaged and the gun could fire. If they left their finger on the trigger, pressed to the rear, after they fired a shot?!?!?!

    I have yet to see a production 92X, much less take one apart. So I really don't know exactly how they ended up making the system work in that gun. I did see a prototype last year and I got to play with one at the NRA convention in April. It took care of over travel with the trigger and set screws in the frame I believe.

    The big question is are they going to make the Xtream trigger bars the same way they make the standard trigger bars. If so, they will have issues with that cast part that is the current trigger bar. It tends to degrade the DA pull over time with the part starts to wear, as many on this forum have discussed in the past. The part I am having made is way too expensive to make for a production gun, or at least at a price the market will accept.

    The whole reason we designed the Wilson Trigger bar to start with is to take care of multiple issues with one part. That keeps the cost down and makes it work regardless of which trigger you use. Steel, polymer, stainless, short reach...... it does not matter which trigger, the Trigger Bar solves the problem of over travel. Also, it solves the issue of the hitch in the DA pull that you get with the new factory cast trigger bars, or in some cases, an early hammer drop in DA from a worn trigger bar. Now we have added in the Short Reset as well and an even harder, slicker finish on the trigger bar.
    Will your new trigger bar also increase the hammer arc in DA like the Wilson Trigger bar? I like the peace of mind that offers when running the 13lb hammer spring my guns came with from you.

  6. #1626
    Quote Originally Posted by falar View Post
    Will your new trigger bar also increase the hammer arc in DA like the Wilson Trigger bar? I like the peace of mind that offers when running the 13lb hammer spring my guns came with from you.
    He designed both....so.

  7. #1627
    Ernest:

    First off, thank you for participating in this forum! It is greatly appreciated!!

    The question I have is will your new OP trigger bar have a similar breaking point where the hammer drops during trigger pull as the WC trigger bar? I assume it will as one of your goals is to increase hammer arc. For me personally I have a bit of a problem with a trigger that breaks close to the frame as opposed to further out.

    TYIA.

  8. #1628

    Question Handling my LTT is new to me........

    I should know every switch, lever and button before I fire my new pistol.
    I DO NOT know how the ( is it decocker only? ) lever funtions.
    I have Smith 39..but the decocker stays down or stays up.
    I'm good on safety, but, could sure use help on my new LTT's handling!!!


    John

  9. #1629
    Quote Originally Posted by tankpondman View Post
    I should know every switch, lever and button before I fire my new pistol.
    I DO NOT know how the ( is it decocker only? ) lever funtions.
    I have Smith 39..but the decocker stays down or stays up.
    I'm good on safety, but, could sure use help on my new LTT's handling!!!


    John
    It's decocker only. The lever should automatically spring back to the "up" position after releasing it, as the original Beretta 92 lever design was a safety that stayed in the "down" position that you're now pushing the decocker lever into when decocking the hammer.

  10. #1630

    Cool Thanks!!!

    So, I,m assuming that any time a round has been chambered and the trigger
    is pulled DA...the chambered round will or should fire.

    Just a beautiful pistol also!!!

    John

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