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Thread: Training Priorities for H2H Integration - one perspective

  1. #31
    Quote Originally Posted by MDS View Post
    Awesome thread, Cecil, thanks! I'd love to hear your thoughts about training "gently" to avoid injury. I can go hard but it costs me more every year, if you know what I mean...

    The first thing to do is realize there is no end point. There is no finish line, so we don't need to be in a huge hurry or be in a great rush. Start working, and keep working, and just focus on getting better.

    Second, check your ego at the door. Training is about getting better and working skills and tasks that we are not good at, not "winning" or getting the submission/throw/KO/whatever. Those are nice, and a good by-product of proper training, but not the most important part. If our partners are much better than us, trying desperately to catch up and somehow beat them can lead to the wrong path and injury. I have been sparring against my coach for 22+ years. I still have not beaten him in any measurable way, but that is not to say I am not substantially better than I was 22 years ago. My goal cannot be beating him, it must be on getting better at the little things along the way.

    Third (and this can be the hardest one) is to make sure you don't train with douchebags. Don't train at a meathead MMA gym, or against testosterone pumped young ones who think that they must beat you at all costs. My gym has a reputation for hard training, but no one ever gets seriously injured, and we literally are a family. But my coach has gotten rid of all the douchebags, and all the new people come through me, and I either teach then the right mindset or they see it is not for them and they find the thug gym.

    Lastly, don't be afraid to push yourself to train hard, but also be willing to coast at times. Maybe sit out a round. Or go really light. Do some rounds with easier partners like lower belts or smaller people. The caveat to that is then you must be willing to give up all physical attributes that would allow you to dominate them (see point 2 above).
    For info about training or to contact me:
    Immediate Action Combatives

  2. #32
    Site Supporter BaiHu's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Cecil Burch View Post
    The first thing to do is realize there is no end point. There is no finish line, so we don't need to be in a huge hurry or be in a great rush. Start working, and keep working, and just focus on getting better.

    Second, check your ego at the door. Training is about getting better and working skills and tasks that we are not good at, not "winning" or getting the submission/throw/KO/whatever. Those are nice, and a good by-product of proper training, but not the most important part. If our partners are much better than us, trying desperately to catch up and somehow beat them can lead to the wrong path and injury. I have been sparring against my coach for 22+ years. I still have not beaten him in any measurable way, but that is not to say I am not substantially better than I was 22 years ago. My goal cannot be beating him, it must be on getting better at the little things along the way.

    Third (and this can be the hardest one) is to make sure you don't train with douchebags. Don't train at a meathead MMA gym, or against testosterone pumped young ones who think that they must beat you at all costs. My gym has a reputation for hard training, but no one ever gets seriously injured, and we literally are a family. But my coach has gotten rid of all the douchebags, and all the new people come through me, and I either teach then the right mindset or they see it is not for them and they find the thug gym.

    Lastly, don't be afraid to push yourself to train hard, but also be willing to coast at times. Maybe sit out a round. Or go really light. Do some rounds with easier partners like lower belts or smaller people. The caveat to that is then you must be willing to give up all physical attributes that would allow you to dominate them (see point 2 above).
    ^^This=Gospel
    Fairness leads to extinction much faster than harsh parameters.

  3. #33
    Member Dropkick's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Dropkick View Post
    What kind of insight can you provide about the transitions between areas during a fight? Especially when the transition is happening to you, instead of by your choice.
    Quote Originally Posted by Cecil Burch View Post
    Like the question about IFWA, this is pretty open-ended and I could write for a long time about it.
    I had a feeling you could really go in depth on that topic. Thank you for the reminder about having a rock solid defense. I find myself frequently chasing after quick and high percentage ways to end things, but first and foremost you have to be able to survive if you're stuck in the pocket.

    I'm rocking my IA shirt today and living the triage.

  4. #34
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    Quote Originally Posted by Cecil Burch View Post
    I personally prefer appendix carry. I am loathe to say it is better than strong side, but there are a couple of ways it does shine. The best reason for it is one I have yet to hear any shooter talk about and that is with AIWB, it is far less likely that I will chicken-wing my elbows outwards while drawing. Arguably that is irrelevant at outside contact range, but within contact range that is quite literally one of the worst things to do. It is also consistently one of the things beginners violate when they start learning how to fight at that range. If I see that gap in an opponent, I WILL take advantage of it, and it most likely will go a long way towards me winning that encounter. With strong side, it is almost impossible to not bend the elbow far out from the body.
    "Keep your enemies close, keep your elbows closer."
    Pretty much a universal rule be it shooting, striking, or grappling.

  5. #35
    Site Supporter MDS's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Cecil Burch View Post
    The first thing to do is realize there is no end point. [...]

    Second, check your ego at the door. [...]

    Third (and this can be the hardest one) is to make sure you don't train with douchebags. [...]

    Lastly, don't be afraid to push yourself to train hard, but also be willing to coast at times. [...]
    Awesome insight, thanks.
    The answer, it seems to me, is wrath. The mind cannot foresee its own advance. --FA Hayek Specialization is for insects.

  6. #36
    Quote Originally Posted by Cecil Burch View Post
    My gut instinct, based on my own personal journey as well as seeing a lot of people train over the years says that 3 months, especially as a beginner is not enough time to absorb any understanding. I feel 6 months is the absolute minimum for most people to begin to grasp the concepts and mental structure of a fighting system. You could have the start of an okay boxing game in that time frame (providing you are in a gym that has legit boxing instruction), and you could just begin to start being comfortable in bad positions in BJJ.

    I would actually think about a year as building the framework for a beginning functional level. Less, and you may miss some important parts to truly "get it".
    Hi Cecil,

    I've finally settled in a bit after my move and started checking out the gyms you recommended in the area. I have zero boxing, wrestling, BJJ or MMA experience, and I think 50/50 seemed like a very nice place to train BJJ to build a solid BJJ base, but they don't offer striking, wrestling or MMA type instruction, which obviously long-term leaves huge gaps in my defense.

    Do you normally recommend people working multiple skills at once, or do you normally have people focusing on one aspect of their H2H game while maintain the rest? Should I be looking for a gym that offers the ability to work all aspects of my MMA over time instead of a gym that only does one thing, but does it really well?

    Thanks,
    Scott

  7. #37
    Quote Originally Posted by scw2 View Post
    Hi Cecil,

    I've finally settled in a bit after my move and started checking out the gyms you recommended in the area. I have zero boxing, wrestling, BJJ or MMA experience, and I think 50/50 seemed like a very nice place to train BJJ to build a solid BJJ base, but they don't offer striking, wrestling or MMA type instruction, which obviously long-term leaves huge gaps in my defense.

    Do you normally recommend people working multiple skills at once, or do you normally have people focusing on one aspect of their H2H game while maintain the rest? Should I be looking for a gym that offers the ability to work all aspects of my MMA over time instead of a gym that only does one thing, but does it really well?

    Thanks,
    Scott
    The only time I think you can improve multiple skills is if :

    1) you are young, super athletic, and have few to no responsibilities.

    2) you already have some previous similar experience. For example, if you were a decent high school wrestler, and even though you may have not done any of that work in 10 years, it is not hard to get rid of some rust reasonably quickly. In that case, you could be working boxing and clinch work and probably gain skill.

    Short of those scenarios, I think focusing on one skill for an extended period gets the best results.
    For info about training or to contact me:
    Immediate Action Combatives

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