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Thread: Roll call stories.

  1. #41
    Member EM_'s Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2012
    Location
    Corn, lots of it.
    Here's an innocent one that explains one of my beliefs about the job: you don't know the job if you haven't smelled it...

    A love story from a slightly different point of view:
    My first day off of FTO I get assigned to an area I’d never worked and catch a suspicious vehicle call. I respond to the area, locate the car, and boom, it’s stolen. A paddy wagon arrives as my cover unit and working inside are a female and male officer.

    One of them points out to me the house the stolen car is parked in front of has been a constant source of domestic and order of protection (OP) violations. Of course it’s the type of OP violations where she only has the OP against him for when she’s mad, he’s drunk, or when things generally just don’t go her way.

    The guy who has the OP against him is exactly the type who would have stolen a car, so we decide a knock on the door is a good idea. He answers, we hook him up for the OP and toss him in my car. He, of course, denies anything about the stolen car, but we get an anonymous call from a neighbor who ID’s him as the one who’d driven the car up. Of course the anonymous call isn’t enough PC to hook him on the car, but we’re about two hours into this nonsense now and a Sgt. has decided to come by and see what the rookie is fucking up. I explain the situation and the Sgt., who was a very old school guy, 35+ years on (fifteen years ago), tells me to go stand behind the paddy wagon (which is behind my squad) while he goes to have a chat with the suspect. I go behind the van and chat with the two officers who had been working the paddy wagon. While we’re chatting the female officer tells me she and her fiancé are having a party the upcoming weekend, and I’m invited since I completed FTO. This is a senior officer inviting me to a party and I’m fresh off of FTO so of course I say yes. I’m excited as hell because the unwritten rule back in the day was if you’re on FTO you don’t go to parties, go drinking with the guys, nothing until you finish the five month FTO program. [We were told repeatedly “You are not a cop yet, you’re not on the team, you’re trying out.” Frankly I think things were better back then in terms of respect and learning from the senior guys, but I’ve gone off track…]

    Sarge is gone a couple of minutes, we hear him chatting and the Sarge comes back. He tells me to get a plastic bag and some latex gloves on. Sarge says the guy confessed and will give me the keys. Assuming I’m getting the keys for evidence to preserve prints (remember, rookie…) I glove up and get the bag. I go back up to my car and the suspect is holding a bloody, shitty set of car keys. There is shit, accented by a little bit of blood, all over my back seat. The friggin’ guy had the keys on him (rookie…) when I put him in the car, realized the jig was about to be up, so when I was fucking around with something he shoves them up his ass (insert rectum joke here: wrecked him, damn near killed him…) and chills there for an hour. Sarge talks him into giving them up and there I was…

    Shift ends, I go to the party the following weekend where I meet the female officer’s younger sister. She’s now my wife and loves it when I tell the story of how we met: because of some shit-stained car keys…

    And she laughs about it which is the secret to staying married to a cop.
    "If I had a grandpa, he would look like Nyeti"

  2. #42
    Quote Originally Posted by maclin View Post
    I'm going to hold off until post-retirement.
    As the totally awestruck non-LE observer here, I'm curled up by the fire with my popcorn enjoying all these stories, and I hope many more of you will post. But in addition to those things that might be better left unsaid until retirement, I would also LOVE to hear some "this is why I do this" stories. I once heard Chuck Haggard talk about running across a DV victim he had helped years earlier, and the woman told him that he changed (even likely saved) her life. The pic of the cop hugging that little kid with the "free hugs" sign chokes me up. But if I see one more "evil trigger-happy cop" story I just might gouge my eyes out with a rusty spoon. So y'all help me out please. :-)

    Southnarc, hope you don't mind this interjection. If so, I stand happily deleted!
    www.FrontSightPress.com
    | Centered and Even |

  3. #43
    You're good Tiff!

  4. #44
    AIWB Cultist Lon's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2011
    Location
    Dayton, Ohio
    October of 2014 is one month I could erase from memory. I'm a Detective, so being the first responder to a suicide or suicidal subject is not the norm for me. This particular day I was the first officer to a suicide that is one of the saddest situations I've dealt with in 20 years. At lunchtime I went up to our parking lot and was standing outside my car when the call came out over the radio for a suicidal subject at one of our local middle schools. Not completely unusual in and of itself, so at first I was going to let the patrol guys handle it. Another radio call came in as I got in my car. This time Dispatch said a student had hung herself in one of the school restrooms. Our PD is relatively close to this middle school so I fired up the lights/siren and called out that I was close. When I got to the school I ran in the building and of course the restroom in question was all the way on the back side of the school. As I'm sprinting down the hallway, I catch up to the principal who told me where to go. I ran in the restroom and went to the second stall and opened the door. When I got the door open, I saw a little 12 year old girl hanging from the coat hook on the inside of the stall door. I cut her down and noticed that she used her shoelace to hang herself. I immediately got the shoelace loosened from around her neck and began CPR. I was doing compressions with one hand and holding my radio in my other while I talked to the other units over the radio. After a few seconds of looking into this little girl's face while I was doing compressions, I had to look away. She looked like my daughter. They could've been sisters. I knew she was gone when I cut her down, but we tried anyway. When the next 2 officers got there, they brought the AED I requested and we pulled her to a more open area so that we could attach the AED and continue CPR. We attached the AED and the machine said "no shock indicated". We kept up the compressions until the squad got there. As we were working on her, one of the officers who brought the AED got a text from her daughter asking if she (the officer) was ok. Her daughter was a student at this school and had saw her running down the hall past her classroom. The fire dept worked her for a while and then transported her to the hospital, where she was pronounced dead.

    Since this school was in my section of town, I was the lead detective on the case. So after the fire dept was done and gone, we processed the scene. I shit you not, the shoelace was tied to the coat hook using a single overhand knot. You know, like the first part of tying your shoes. I couldn't believe it held and didn't come loose.

    After clearing the scene, I had to go meet with a Judge to get a search warrant signed for another case and then go execute the warrant. By the time I was done with work, my daughter had left to spend the night with my inlaws. She couldn't understand why I showed up at their house to give her a big hug.

    So now I had to figure out what had fucked up this 12 year old to the point she thought she had no other option but to kill herself. From all accounts, she was happy at school that day and had given no indication she was planning this. Come to find out, this wasn't the first time she had thought of, or tried to commit suicide. She had recently been in a juvenile treatment facility for suicide attempt and had only gotten out a few weeks earlier.

    The next morning I got a call from this girls mother. She wanted to come in and speak with me. So of course I told her to come in. We had not talked to her the day before because she ended having a break down at the hospital and was sedated. So my captain and I meet with her in a conference room and offer our condolences. The first words out of her mouth concerned whether or not the school was liable in any way for her death. Not why did she do it, was there a note, etc. but was the school negligent in some manner. That set the tone for the meeting. Not once did she ever shed a tear or break down.

    For the next 3 weeks I talked to a bunch of different people about this little girl and her life. I won't mention specifics because I'm sure there's gonna be a lawsuit filed against the school by the mother. Needless to say, I found no fault on the part of the school and found the cause of the little girls depression was much closer to home and could have been prevented if mom actually gave a shit. It got to the point where I refused to talk to her mom. I told my captain he would end up doing an IA on me if I was ever in the same room with mom again. The sad thing is that unless someone does a public records request for that report no one will know what a tragedy it really was. if it was up to me I would have had a press conference and announced what we found out during our investigation. But by the time two months had gone by, the news had moved on to bigger and more controversial stories.

    I won't deny I was pretty fucked up for a few days afterward. The 2 uniforms who did CPR with me ended having to clear the scene and handle calls for a couple of hours until a Capt found out and pulled them off the street and sent them home. We ended up having to deal with a bunch of irate parents during the midst of all of this. The school went on a lockdown while we were there not because of any danger, but to avoid exposing them to the fire dept and coroner etc. Well some dipshit cop from another jurisdiction heard the radio call and put out a Facebook post saying some girl hung herself at this school. Of course that went viral. So then we had all sorts of family members showing up and causing problems.

    I wish I had a delete button in my brain. I can still picture her lifeless eyes when I think about that day. The system (children's services) failed that little girl. Her family failed her. Unfortunately nothing rose to a criminal level. I would have loved to be able to charge someone.
    Last edited by Lon; 06-01-2015 at 12:11 PM.
    Formerly known as xpd54.
    The opinions expressed in this post are my own and do not reflect the opinions or policies of my employer.
    www.gunsnobbery.wordpress.com

  5. #45
    LE Forum Moderator BehindBlueI's's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2015
    Location
    Midwest
    Quote Originally Posted by maclin View Post
    The friggin’ guy had the keys on him (rookie…) when I put him in the car, realized the jig was about to be up, so when I was fucking around with something he shoves them up his ass (insert rectum joke here: wrecked him, damn near killed him…) and chills there for an hour.
    If he got car keys in there, not the first time he's used the prison pocket.

  6. #46
    Licorice Bootlegger JDM's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2011
    Location
    Albuquerque
    Quote Originally Posted by Lon View Post
    October of 2014 is one month I could erase from memory. I'm a Detective, so being the first responder to a suicide or suicidal subject is not the norm for me. This particular day I was the first officer to a suicide that is one of the saddest situations I've dealt with in 20 years. At lunchtime I went up to our parking lot and was standing outside my car when the call came out over the radio for a suicidal subject at one of our local middle schools. Not completely unusual in and of itself, so at first I was going to let the patrol guys handle it. Another radio call came in as I got in my car. This time Dispatch said a student had hung herself in one of the school restrooms. Our PD is relatively close to this middle school so I fired up the lights/siren and called out that I was close. When I got to the school I ran in the building and of course the restroom in question was all the way on the back side of the school. As I'm sprinting down the hallway, I catch up to the principal who told me where to go. I ran in the restroom and went to the second stall and opened the door. When I got the door open, I saw a little 12 year old girl hanging from the coat hook on the inside of the stall door. I cut her down and noticed that she used her shoelace to hang herself. I immediately got the shoelace loosened from around her neck and began CPR. I was doing compressions with one hand and holding my radio in my other while I talked to the other units over the radio. After a few seconds of looking into this little girl's face while I was doing compressions, I had to look away. She looked like my daughter. They could've been sisters. I knew she was gone when I cut her down, but we tried anyway. When the next 2 officers got there, they brought the AED I requested and we pulled her to a more open area so that we could attach the AED and continue CPR. We attached the AED and the machine said "no shock indicated". We kept up the compressions until the squad got there. As we were working on her, one of the officers who brought the AED got a text from her daughter asking if she (the officer) was ok. Her daughter was a student at this school and had saw her running down the hall past her classroom. The fire dept worked her for a while and then transported her to the hospital, where she was pronounced dead.

    Since this school was in my section of town, I was the lead detective on the case. So after the fire dept was done and gone, we processed the scene. I shit you not, the shoelace was tied to the coat hook using a single overhand knot. You know, like the first part of tying your shoes. I couldn't believe it held and didn't come loose.

    After clearing the scene, I had to go meet with a Judge to get a search warrant signed for another case and then go execute the warrant. By the time I was done with work, my daughter had left to spend the night with my inlaws. She couldn't understand why I showed up at their house to give her a big hug.

    So now I had to figure out what had fucked up this 12 year old to the point she thought she had no other option but to kill herself. From all accounts, she was happy at school that day and had given no indication she was planning this. Come to find out, this wasn't the first time she had thought of, or tried to commit suicide. She had recently been in a juvenile treatment facility for suicide attempt and had only gotten out a few weeks earlier.

    The next morning I got a call from this girls mother. She wanted to come in and speak with me. So of course I told her to come in. We had not talked to her the day before because she ended having a break down at the hospital and was sedated. So my captain and I meet with her in a conference room and offer our condolences. The first words out of her mouth concerned whether or not the school was liable in any way for her death. Not why did she do it, was there a note, etc. but was the school negligent in some manner. That set the tone for the meeting. Not once did she ever shed a tear or break down.

    For the next 3 weeks I talked to a bunch of different people about this little girl and her life. I won't mention specifics because I'm sure there's gonna be a lawsuit filed against the school by the mother. Needless to say, I found no fault on the part of the school and found the cause of the little girls depression was much closer to home and could have been prevented if mom actually gave a shit. It got to the point where I refused to talk to her mom. I told my captain he would end up doing an IA on me if I was ever in the same room with mom again. The sad thing is that unless someone does a public records request for that report no one will know what a tragedy it really was. if it was up to me I would have had a press conference and announced what we found out during our investigation. But by the time two months had gone by, the news had moved on to bigger and more controversial stories.

    I won't deny I was pretty fucked up for a few days afterward. The 2 uniforms who did CPR with me ended having to clear the scene and handle calls for a couple of hours until a Capt found out and pulled them off the street and sent them home. We ended up having to deal with a bunch of irate parents during the midst of all of this. The school went on a lockdown while we were there not because of any danger, but to avoid exposing them to the fire dept and coroner etc. Well some dipshit cop from another jurisdiction heard the radio call and put out a Facebook post saying some girl hung herself at this school. Of course that went viral. So then we had all sorts of family members showing up and causing problems.

    I wish I had a delete button in my brain. I can still picture her lifeless eyes when I think about that day. The system (children's services) failed that little girl. Her family failed her. Unfortunately nothing rose to a criminal level. I would have loved to be able to charge someone.
    That was rough to read.

    What do you do to get past something like that?
    Nobody is impressed by what you can't do. -THJ

  7. #47
    AIWB Cultist Lon's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2011
    Location
    Dayton, Ohio
    Quote Originally Posted by BOM View Post
    That was rough to read.

    What do you do to get past something like that?
    I turned to my wife primarily. She's a cop's daughter and also a victim advocate (that's how we met). I'm a lucky guy to have such a great wife. She helped me more than anything.

    Some guys turn to booze, which never ends well. Some guys turn to their faith in God and his plan. I'm a believer, but calls like this make me struggle with questioning God's plan. Especially when I think back to the last person prior to this who hung themself that I cut down and did CPR on. That meth head lived. And still hits the meth, the last I checked.

    I will say this. My brass did a good job looking out for our mental well being. We did the critical incident debriefs and they also allowed us to see a world class Dr. - Kathy Platoni. It was Kathys unit that got shot up at Ft. Hood. She's out of the military now and focuses on helping Soldiers and cops deal with shootings and other stuff.
    Formerly known as xpd54.
    The opinions expressed in this post are my own and do not reflect the opinions or policies of my employer.
    www.gunsnobbery.wordpress.com

  8. #48
    Some just do and some just don't. Not sure there's anything one "can do" to get "past" something like that.

    Part of being a cop.

  9. #49
    Very Pro Dentist Chuck Haggard's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2011
    Location
    Down the road from Quantrill's big raid.
    For anyone in police work, thinking about police work, or people wanting a look into what the job does to people, I can not recommend "Emotional Survival for Law Enforcement" by Kevin Gilmartin highly enough.
    I am the owner of Agile/Training and Consulting
    www.agiletactical.com

  10. #50
    Quote Originally Posted by Chuck Haggard View Post
    For anyone in police work, thinking about police work, or people wanting a look into what the job does to people, I can not recommend "Emotional Survival for Law Enforcement" by Kevin Gilmartin highly enough.
    Just got around to this thread and I was going to suggest the same thing.

    Give a copy to your family, inlaws, kids (when they are old enough), holiday presents to coworkers....book explains a lot and hits a lot of good points.
    VDMSR.com
    Chief Developer for V Development Group
    Everything I post I do so as a private individual who is not representing any company or organization.

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