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Thread: Roll call stories.

  1. #11
    LE Forum Moderator BehindBlueI's's Avatar
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    Mar 2015
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    I'll start.

    I've had an issue with one sergeant, and only one. Our department merged with the sheriff's dept shortly after I was hired, and when I came out of the academy we were under the Sheriff. My FTO was former county, most of my beat partners were former county, but on my district there wasn't a big deal made about who was former city and who was former county. Years later I transferred to another district at the request of a sergeant who wanted me to come work for him. The merger had not been as well received there, and it was to the point that county sat on one side of the room, city sat on the other, and people hired after the merger sat in the middle. This wasn't an official rule, and I had no idea. I cast my lot by sitting on the 'county' side. I ended up working a pretty suburban beat and all of my beat partners came from county. In the eyes of the particular sergeant (not the one who asked me to come down), I was "county by association". County equated to cowboys with no discipline in his mind, we were too rough, we were too crude, etc. etc. Former city guys could paint brush a guy and nothing was said. Former county? Issues. I was shielded by my own sergeant until he went to Investigations. Then the issues began.

    The big one was a kid on acid. He was a smaller guy, which was good. If he'd been my size we'd have had to kill him. The real short version is he got high, kicked in the neighbors' window, and was acting erratically. We attempted to subdue him but he had no pain response and had the tard/narcotics strength going on. He gator rolled my partner and the fight was on. Mommy complained, and sergeant got involved. He recommended criminal charges against us for battery. Everyone from the LT up told him he was out of his mind, not only was it not battery but it was reasonable given the situation. He went to the prosecutor anyway and was laughed out of the office. Combined with his distain for "county" and the fact we "won" he made it his mission to screw with us. The LT was old school and kept him in check, but as soon as the LT left he thought he had free reign, which led to this:

    The final draw was a group home outing. Three 13-15 year old black males with various levels of mental retardation cause a disturbance at a restaurant. I talk to the trip leader/group home employee. She says #1 fled the van and went in the restaurant and had a conniption. #2 and #3 went in with her and helped get him out. Everyone was under control, and I was going 10-8 no report. He shows up and locks all 3 of them up, berates them for causing a disturbance, says we won't have that in restaurants on our side of town, etc. He doesn't want to hear that 2 of them were actually helping. They are "thugs" to him. Then I get berated for not arresting them and "doing my job." The next day I have to talk to the admin sgt about why I didn't arrest anyone. After the first incident, I bought a hidden voice recorder. I had recorded the entire interaction. The "thugs" had zero juvenile history and the charges were dropped as soon as they got to juvenile processing, meaning it was a bad arrest. I asked if "thugs" was code for black, as neither their behavior nor their histories indicated anything "thug" like. I noted the charges had been dropped immediately because they were BS. I noted that two mentally challenged kids had been berated for being helpful, so what happens the next time the trip leader needs their help to control one of their fellows? I noted that this seemed motivated by our previous history and not by any desire to serve the public, as the owner of the restaurant had already been told what was going on and was ok with it prior to the sergeant showing up. I "won" again.

    Then every use of force I had was under the microscope. So, I quit doing anything proactive. LT asked why. I said why. The situation was rectified temporarily while a permanent solution was sought. My own solution was to make Detective and not have to deal with it any longer. The district's answer was to swap him to a new district. Like the military, the police usually don't fix problems as much as pass them to someone else every few years.

    That's my one and only truly negative interaction with a sergeant beyond the standard "you screwed up, let's deal with it and move on" that everyone gets. In almost all of those, I'd screwed up and I dealt with it.

  2. #12
    The Major of Operations at the agency I retired from hated me literally from day one until the day I retired. It only got worse as I rose through the ranks and commanded more and more respect in the agency. I became the lead DT instructor at our regional academy and actually got him involved with firearms training at the academy level as an olive branch to try and kiss this dude's ass a little so I got the target off my back. No luck. When I started teaching in the private sector it REALLY hit an all time high ans stayed there.

    As my luck would have it he also was the head of firearms training at my agency.

    I attended one of the first NRA Tactical Shooting Instructor courses run by Clive Sheppard. I'm sure some old school guys will remember him. Pretty decent guy. Now originally the intention behind the course was that it be an advanced inst' development course that carried forward from the LE Basic Handgun/Shotgun Inst' course. So I paid for this course out of my pocket and took vacation time to go do it, and was able to get in without the pre-req of the Basic Inst. course because I shot the standards clean on day one.

    I completed the course and a few months go by. The Sheriff at the time sees me in the hallway after I had come out of a preliminary hearing and says "We got quals this week so I want you to show me some of that high-speed tactical shit you learned in school". Of course my first thought is "Oh you mean the one I paid for you fucking dick", but what came out of my mouth was "Sir the Major hasn't sent me a memo about participating in quals". He says "I told him to start working you in on the range during qualifications. Let me see what's up"

    The next day I get a call from the Major and this is what he tells me:

    Him: Hey I called the NRA as I was a little unsure of exactly what they qualified you to teach and they said that if you want to teach BASIC firearms, you're going to have to attend the BASIC course.

    Me: Sir I just attended a course that qualifies me to teach ADVANCED handgun skills. Are you telling me that I can continue to run the SWAT team, do all the quals for them, qualify our drug unit, but NOT teach rank and file fundamentals of marksmanship?

    Him: Hey son you don't like it talk to the NRA.


    And he hangs up.

    When I retired I had taught ECQ handgun skills in 30 states, 5 countries outside of the US and had been brought in to 3 branches of the U.S. military. BUT...I can't teach marksmanship on the MS. Gulf Coast.

  3. #13
    Quote Originally Posted by BehindBlueI's View Post
    So, I quit doing anything proactive. LT asked why. I said why. The situation was rectified temporarily while a permanent solution was sought. My own solution was to make Detective and not have to deal with it any longer. The district's answer was to swap him to a new district. Like the military, the police usually don't fix problems as much as pass them to someone else every few years.
    Boy does THAT sound familiar...

  4. #14
    In those days we didn’t have MCT’s or in-car cameras yet so I had become accustomed to using a small audio recorder on stops. So, it was 1997 or 1998 and I had been moved to the north side of town after another guy and I had received death threats from a family whose son had died in custody. I was pretty heavily involved at that point in doing jump-outs, foot patrols in any of our open air drug markets, search warrants, etc. I hated working the country club because dealing with rich folk who think they are better than everybody is irritating. I was working traffic heavy to pass the time and not catch a stupid alarm call when I clocked a beige Lexus 4-door at 68 in a 45 being driven by a black male. I stopped him and made an approach to the car. I could tell by our initial conversation that the ticket was going to send this douche into orbit. I kept an audio recorder for situations that I thought were going to shit. I write the guy a ticket and go back to his car, recorder in hand. I begin explaining the ticket to him and he begins cussing me and reminds me that he used to be a magistrate back in the day. I then gave him his citation and walked back to my car. He stopped beside me and gave me another few choice words. He could tell by the look on my face that his rope had run out so he left. ETA: I had just been sent to and finished verbal judo class so I was in full "verbal judo" mode from the start of the traffic stop.

    Next day I get called by my Sgt to come to the PD. I didn’t have a cell phone so I stopped at a pay phone and called. He told me that the Chief was pissed and that I was to report to his office immediately. So, I’m like ok…I will get the Chief on tape being an ass as he fires me and we will see where it goes. I get there and press record on my recorder…Sgt asks WTF am I doing so I tell him. He almost passes out. He tells me that the Chief came in and cussed me all down the back hallway because I had cussed the wrong one out. Sgt was like he didn’t cuss anyone. Chief was like how do you know, you weren’t there (see where this is going?). He said no but I had recorded everything. Chief gets a puzzled look and goes to his office. I get there and his secretary advises that he’s busy. He comes out a few minutes later and asks if he can have my tape and that he would get it back to me. I very bluntly said “No, it’s mine…I paid for it…If if was evidence it would be in the evidence room.” Sgt is in vapor lock. He said he would listen to it. After doing so he says that he has no choice but to support me because the guy (his friend since elementary school) had lied to him. Feeling ballsy (I was about 25 or 26) I ask if I can speak my mind. He says I can. I told him it was a damn shame that the officers at the PD worried more about the admin/staff of the agency than the thugs on the street…and I would appreciate a camera in my car because I was tired of spending my own money on tapes to protect myself. Sgt could have slid under the door at that moment. We have a closed door meeting wherein he essentially asks me if I had lost my damn mind. My line of thinking: fuck it, they ain’t watching our backs because they were too scared.

    As I leave the building a detective tells me to run the guys license and walks away with a smirk on his face. *Back then if you had what appeared to be a valid license we didn’t run it every time. So I called dispatch and sure enough that pricks license was suspended. I get the printout and take it back to the chief and tell him I’m swearing a warrant. He stops me and says don’t do it, let me see what going on first. He then goes to the detective division and has them run it…mind you I had just done that. That pissed me off beyond belief so I went and swore out a warrant….took it to the chief and told him I knew that he didn’t trust his officers and that was the hardest pill to swallow for all of us. Essentially a FUCK YOU ASSHOLE!

    I gave the warrant to a guy on night shift who went to the country club and arrested his ass. Suspect was embarrassed and complained to the council, who by that time had heard the tape and read a transcript. They told him to go piss in the wind. He was eventually convicted but the Chief always watched me out of the corner of his eye. I had the bulls-eye from that point forward. I left the agency about 2 years later.

  5. #15
    Yeah I did some shit like that in my twenties...

    Good story dude!

  6. #16
    And KeeFus if you want to say rich, white folk, then say it. Your story dude.

    These guys want to know so tell them. Warts and all.

  7. #17
    What a great thread. I enjoy reading real cop stories.


    Sent from my iPhone, I apologize in advance for typos.

    "Gustatus similis pullus"

  8. #18
    I hit one guy in my career who was wearing handcuffs and couldn't fight back.

    I got hit by a judge's wife in '94 going to a burglary of an occupied dwelling call. She t-boned me at about 60 miles per hour on the passenger side and had I not been in a 1988 Crown Vic I'd probably be dead. What I did get out of it was a complete rupture of the disc at C4/C5. I lost ALOT of use in my right arm and was in extreme pain for about 10 months. I worked patrol the entire time and took three sick days for neurosurgeon appts.

    So that's the state I was in on a domestic I was a backup on one evening and the primary officer was a good guy but no physical specimen. He hits his panic button and the primary channel diverts completely to his portable.

    I get there and he's fighting this short stocky pulpwood hauler who's drunk but able. Actually he's not really fighting he's getting his ass handed to him. I launch from behind, slip a choke on him and start pulling him back, when we both lose our balance and fall. Him on top and right on my upper back. We hit the ground and my first thought is "I'm fucked up". He spins around and punches me in the balls pretty solid, starts to get up and I catch his pants leg and trip him. My primary officer hits him with a Streamlight SL20 and his eyes roll just enough for both of us to dog-pile him and bull him into cuffs.

    He's compliant at this point but talking shit. I am in pain. ALOT.

    He looks at me as he turns around to sit down in the prisoner compartment of the primary's car and says "Weak bitch". I hit him with one of the hardest crosses I've ever thrown and break his jaw.

    The End.

    Not proud of that but I did it.

  9. #19
    Quote Originally Posted by SouthNarc View Post
    And KeeFus if you want to say rich, white folk, then say it. Your story dude.

    These guys want to know so tell them. Warts and all.
    Lol. Tried to delete that before it was seen. Was not wanting to offend any rich white folk. Im working in another...stand-by.

  10. #20
    Ride-along story, keep in mind my comments from the other thread about how ride-alongs are supposed to go. It had to be 1996ish and a friend of mine wanted to ride. He eventually would be a SC trooper in Myrtle Beach before quitting and coming back to NC and getting into EMS.

    I was on the evening shift (1700-0200) and we were hitting some high crime areas, something I wasn’t supposed to be doing. I hear a call go out to go to the local middle school to a disturbance. Another officer responds and shortly after arriving requests assistance. Turns out, a parent was pissed at a coach over his kid (go figure). A pissing contest ensues and the officer is trying unsuccessfully to calm them down…and now the crowd is getting involved. I respond, ride-along in tow, and pull right up to where the officer is trying to arrest someone. Out nowhere a black dude runs up and hits the officer. Anyone that knows LE knows that when one of your friends gets hit its go time. I jumped from my cruiser, telling ride-along to stay put. I grab the dude and toss him to the ground. Other officer is telling him he is going to get sprayed (no tasers or ASP batons in those days). Dude is still fighting. Some blows are exchanged…some words are spoken. Local preacher is now screaming at us to stop and tells the crowd that I just told his homie that I was going to break his arm if he didn’t quit resisting.

    We finally get the guy arrested. Ride-along’s eyes are big as tractor tires…he’s pumped. Obviously a complaint of excessive force was filed…same chief from other story so you probably know how this is going to go.
    One day about a month later I and another officer, who got there about near the end of the scuffle, get called in and at that point I have my first of many Garrity Warnings. This was before the in-custody death and other stuff.

    The IA Captain, a stone cold token of a Captain, asked me various questions…but he was quite inquisitive over me telling the guy I’d break his arm. He wanted to know if I really meant it. Hell yes I meant it. His eyes…confused he was. I then told him that the guy had already been sprayed, we had no impact weapons (SL20 was in the car) and I asked what else was I to do? He had no answer. A few days later we were called to the Chiefs office…I had a permanent seat, which was the one closest to the window. Initially, the conversation sounded like we were going to get some days. Then one of the other Captains, a true leader, saved us from the asshole. The Captain relayed that we didn’t hear or see any of the initial officers’ actions. All we saw was an officer get punched…and any officer worth their salt would have done the same thing we did. The initial officer had quit to go back to the beach to work so the cleared me and the other guy and blamed the whole incident on him because he didn’t know how to speak to people…

    They never, not once, called the ride-along to interview him.

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