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Thread: The 40cal on its way out?

  1. #231
    Quote Originally Posted by Baldanders View Post
    but .38/.357 is very lightly stocked and seems to be on the way out.
    Guess again. S&W J-frames are hugely popular. Kimber & Colt didnít decide to start producing small-frame .38/.357s just to see if they could. I believe RIA introduced a carry revolver recently as well.

    The difference in ammo availability is due to auto loaders being shot a whole lot more. People who buy small frame carry revolvers generally donít shoot them much. Folks like myself and some other forum members Iíve met shoot our revolvers a LOT. But while Iím at the local indoor range completing a revolver super drill (18 rounds), there are probably ten times that many 9mm rounds (plus the same amount of .223s) sent down range.

    I canít speak much to cost since 95% of my shooting is handloads.

    During the great ammo drought that followed the Newtown shooting, I noticed .40 S&W was about the only CF pistol ammo that was regularly in stock (I was on the lookout for .22 lr.)

    To me, this indicates it is not a popular civilian round.

    Maybe it will get popular, at least for a while, with all the cheap LE trade ins. I just bought a little-used G35 to try in USPSA limited.

  2. #232
    I'd say alot of experts buried the 10mm ....
    The 40 S&W ain't going anywhere.....
    Myself I have two Glock 23's and my EDC is a 27 .... and my carry ammo is Federal 180gr HST

  3. #233
    Member JonInWA's Avatar
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    I think that the .40 platforms that will flourish are those specifically designed to handle and mitigate it's recoil impulse from its quick, intensive pressure spike on firing. Also crucial is how they can concurrently provide durability. Personally, I'm most impressed with HK .40s (in my case, a VP40 and P30L V1 LEM) and Gen 4 Glocks (G22). HK's approach is to increase slide mass and/or incorporate a polymer buffer component to the RSA's flat-wire spring, Glock's has been to utilize a triple-nested progressive/variable RSA.

    Best, Jon

  4. #234
    Member Galbraith's Avatar
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    .40 isn't going anywhere. In fact, I would not be surprised as firearms technology evolves that it makes a comeback in some fashion. It really depends on what firearm is running the cartridge as whether the cartridge becomes desireable to the shooter. It's got a great projectile design which is very robust and expands reliably, and it has the velocity to punch through a wide variety of barriers. I did find it finicky to reload due to the small case capacity, and pressure spikes. I have never encountered a caliber that was so prone to keyholing and accuracy issues as when loading 180gr plated bullets on the .40S&W, especially 180gr Gold Dots. This was from two different Sig P229 barrels. 10mm Auto definately manages the pressure curve better, and was far easier to load for in a wide variety of bullet weights. Personally, I prefer the .45acp/10mm length action for running anything .40" caliber and up as the loading characteristics are easier to manage, and thus recoil and accuracy is better.

  5. #235
    Quote Originally Posted by Galbraith View Post
    .40 isn't going anywhere. In fact, I would not be surprised as firearms technology evolves that it makes a comeback in some fashion. It really depends on what firearm is running the cartridge as whether the cartridge becomes desireable to the shooter. It's got a great projectile design which is very robust and expands reliably, and it has the velocity to punch through a wide variety of barriers. I did find it finicky to reload due to the small case capacity, and pressure spikes. I have never encountered a caliber that was so prone to keyholing and accuracy issues as when loading 180gr plated bullets on the .40S&W, especially 180gr Gold Dots. This was from two different Sig P229 barrels. 10mm Auto definately manages the pressure curve better, and was far easier to load for in a wide variety of bullet weights. Personally, I prefer the .45acp/10mm length action for running anything .40" caliber and up as the loading characteristics are easier to manage, and thus recoil and accuracy is better.
    I agree, especially to the which gun part. Guns that we're designed as .40s (P229, USP, PX4, etc) are better platforms than up scaled 9mms (GLOCK, Beretta 96, etc) IMHO.

  6. #236
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    Quote Originally Posted by Galbraith View Post
    .40 isn't going anywhere. In fact, I would not be surprised as firearms technology evolves that it makes a comeback in some fashion. It really depends on what firearm is running the cartridge as whether the cartridge becomes desireable to the shooter.
    I do not think the .40 will ever become as popular as it was at its peak of several years ago.

  7. #237
    Member richiecotite's Avatar
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    40 will never be as popular as I was a few years ago. That doesnít mean itís on its way out any more than 38 and .357 are on their way out.

    The fact that all those police trade in guns from the last 20 years means there are hundreds of thousands in the wild. I imagine most of those police trade in guns will be shot a few tomes a year.

    If anything, I see the 40 and all these police trade in guns the same way people saw 38 and model 10ís a dozen years ago.


    Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
    "I'm a tactical operator and Instructor and also retired military."

    -read on another forum

  8. #238
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    Regarding the 40, check this... new gun for PMESP Ė PolŪcia Militar do Estado de S„o Paulo (S„o Paulo State Military Police), Brazil.

    https://www.thefirearmblog.com/blog/...p-full-videos/

    It's a G22 Gen5 with thumb safety identical to MHS pistol, and thicker slide (like that of a 45 GAP, more mass) to better handle the 40 recoil impulse.

  9. #239
    There will always be shooters who keep a 40 caliber weapon around and shoot with it. Just like people keep other by-gone calibers like .327 or .32ACP. But as long as the 40S&W does the same thing to a bad guy as 9mm thereís no logical reason to choose the caliber that is harder on guns and parts, harder to control, and harder to shoot well. I believe 40 is dead as a service caliber. It may limp on for years the way some people and agencies keep 45 because they canít let go psychologically.
    Unless you have a large, tubular optic on your pistol, front slide serrations are dumb and cosmetic. It pains me to see armed professionals get so excited over them.

  10. #240
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    Quote Originally Posted by TiroFijo View Post
    Regarding the 40, check this... new gun for PMESP Ė PolŪcia Militar do Estado de S„o Paulo (S„o Paulo State Military Police), Brazil.

    https://www.thefirearmblog.com/blog/...p-full-videos/

    It's a G22 Gen5 with thumb safety identical to MHS pistol, and thicker slide (like that of a 45 GAP, more mass) to better handle the 40 recoil impulse.
    Old News.

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