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Thread: Yong Lee’s Pistol Grip Technique (finger over trigger guard)

  1. #1
    Site Supporter Hieronymous's Avatar
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    Yong Lee’s Pistol Grip Technique (finger over trigger guard)



    I stumbled across this video recently and it intrigued me. Aside from the grip over trigger guard technique, of particular interest is the fact that Yong Lee evidently applies different grip techniques to different semi automatic pistols. I assume that would be the case for all of us in regards to full frame pistols versus sub-compacts, but it doesn’t appear that that’s what he’s referencing in this video.

    I’m not shooting often enough to attempt to implement his finger over trigger technique at this time, but I would be curious to know what some of our members think about this approach as well as anyone’s thoughts about applying different grip techniques to different platforms. Thanks in advance for sharing your collective wisdom.

  2. #2
    Site Supporter 1911Nut's Avatar
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    Many year ago, that's the way many of the top competitive shooters gripped a pistol. I haven't seen it used in at least 12-15 years.

  3. #3
    A panopoly of panopticons awp_101's Avatar
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    IIRC that's why squared off 1911 trigger guards became popular and some pistols picked up a slight protrusion at the bottom front of the trigger guard.

    It's old school enough that I started shooting that way in the 90s because I remembered seeing it in magazines going back to the 80s and even now my finger finds a natural rest there with some pistols.
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  4. #4
    It gets your support hand higher on a gun which is rarely a bad thing. If you've enough strength / skills to provide adequate support grip pressure without support index finger contribution AND your support index finger doesn't do stupid things to gun's alignment by hooking or pushing on a trigger guard, it is theoretically a more advantageous grip. Those are two big ifs though and most people just don't bother especially that conventional grip gives baller results too.
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    Member Alpha Sierra's Avatar
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    Your hands have to be big enough to use that grip. No two ways about it. Mine aren't.

    In any case, I wouldn't copy someone's grip without a full explanation, from that person, of what's going on. I've listened to Lee in some videos and there are details about how he grips that can't be understood from a picture.
    Last edited by Alpha Sierra; 03-20-2019 at 04:14 AM.

  6. #6
    Jerry Barnhart shoots that way (finger over the trigger guard). Although in his instructional video he recommends against it. He does show the proper technique if you do chose that method. Most novice shooters that use this method, don’t do it effectively, as you can see the finger coming off under recoil.

    On the other hand, some use it to great effect.

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  7. #7
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    As I understand it Eric uses it because he always has, but doesn't recommend it if you aren't doing it already.
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  8. #8
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    Lots of IPSC shooters wrapped the index finger of the support hand around the front of the trigger guard in the late 70s through the 80s. Then the technique largely fell from favor.

    I knew some shooters with fairly big hands who did that and it worked for them. I have fairly big hands, and after experimenting with it, I discarded it as a technique I did not particularly like or find beneficial.

    What is old is new again.

  9. #9
    Site Supporter miller_man's Avatar
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    Read the entire post, his question was about having different grip style matched to different guns.

    I would think that would get complicated if switching guns often. But I do think you might have to tailor some grip technique (and especially some gun handling techniques) to each platform - but for me that comes with working with just one for a good amount of time and practice.
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  10. #10
    Site Supporter Hieronymous's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Alpha Sierra View Post
    Your hands have to be big enough to use that grip. No two ways about it. Mine aren't.

    In any case, I wouldn't copy someone's grip without a full explanation, from that person, of what's going on. I've listened to Lee in some videos and there are details about how he grips that can't be understood from a picture.

    I don't think mine are big enough either as a test run of my cleared Glock 19 seems to not leave enough meat of the palm on the grip. I wonder if Yong Lee's application of different grips to different pistols can be explained by that. If memory serves, the trigger guard on a USP .40 I had years ago was quite a bit longer than most. Maybe he couldn't effectively do finger over trigger guard on a platform like that, but on others he can and does.

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