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TRSmith
11-15-2020, 12:24 AM
Hello!
I am new to your forum, new to shooting, and new to reloading. I have started with the basic Lee Loader kit for my 38 snubby, and I am getting interested in reloading for my 9mm Taurus. I realize that reloading for the revolver is pretty straight forward, but I know using reloads in a semi auto will be more touchy. How tricky might this be? My 9mm goal is to load some casted bullets over a light powder charge for some low-recoil self-defense practice at 30 feet. I have some Titegroup powder, some Accurate #2 powder, a caliper, and my eyes on a LEE C press. Please advise...

SecondsCount
11-15-2020, 08:46 AM
Welcome!

What is the weight in grains of the bullet that you plan on shooting?

I have tried 115 grain cast bullets in 9mm and was having barrel leading problems by the time I loaded up enough powder to get the slide to operate. 147 grain bullets worked well, and I am currently loading 135 grain powder coated bullets with Clay Dot which is a fast burning powder similar to what you are using.

JM Campbell
11-15-2020, 08:48 AM
Hello!
I am new to your forum, new to shooting, and new to reloading. I have started with the basic Lee Loader kit for my 38 snubby, and I am getting interested in reloading for my 9mm Taurus. I realize that reloading for the revolver is pretty straight forward, but I know using reloads in a semi auto will be more touchy. How tricky might this be? My 9mm goal is to load some casted bullets over a light powder charge for some low-recoil self-defense practice at 30 feet. I have some Titegroup powder, some Accurate #2 powder, a caliper, and my eyes on a LEE C press. Please advise...

Hi-Tek coated lead projectiles would be a better option then the uncoated lead for a semi. If your set on loading lead projectiles you will need to bell the cases so when seating the projectiles you will not shave the sides of the projectile.

https://forums.brianenos.com/topic/91906-how-much-flair-is-appropriate-pics-of-any-examples/

https://youtu.be/f3kTZgfPTD8


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JM Campbell
11-15-2020, 08:51 AM
Another thought is where are you located? A really cool member here with reloading experience might just be local to you and be able to help get you started in person.


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TRSmith
11-15-2020, 09:25 AM
Another thought is where are you located? A really cool member here with reloading experience might just be local to you and be able to help get you started in person.


Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk


I am in Michigan, Pontiac area.

olstyn
11-15-2020, 09:26 AM
Bare lead + Titegroup = lots of smoke, and potential leading problems. As JM Campbell said, you'll be much better off with coated bullets. In terms of being more "touchy" to load, I would say that 9mm is not particularly difficult - it's what I first learned on, and I never had any real issues. Generally speaking, loads from a manual should be in the safe range which will cycle the gun without causing problems, so I'd recommend that you start there. (Coated lead bullets can usually use the same load data as equivalent weight/similar profile bare lead bullets.)

TRSmith
11-15-2020, 09:28 AM
Hi-Tek coated lead projectiles would be a better option then the uncoated lead for a semi. If your set on loading lead projectiles you will need to bell the cases so when seating the projectiles you will not shave the sides of the projectile.

https://forums.brianenos.com/topic/91906-how-much-flair-is-appropriate-pics-of-any-examples/

https://youtu.be/f3kTZgfPTD8


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So, lead does not work well with a semi auto? I am not set on a bullet, I am just trying to find the easiest/best way to reload one practice loads.

TRSmith
11-15-2020, 09:29 AM
Bare lead + Titegroup = lots of smoke, and potential leading problems. As JM Campbell said, you'll be much better off with coated bullets. In terms of being more "touchy" to load, I would say that 9mm is not particularly difficult - it's what I first learned on, and I never had any real issues. Generally speaking, loads from a manual should be in the safe range which will cycle the gun without causing problems, so I'd recommend that you start there. (Coated lead bullets can usually use the same load data as equivalent weight/similar profile bare lead bullets.)


Thanks for the helpful info.

Borderland
11-15-2020, 09:34 AM
Welcome to the forum.

The difference in revolver loads and semi-auto is the crimp. Revolver loads generally take a roll crimp (cannelured bullet) and semi-auto a taper crimp. I would suggest doing your bullet seating and crimping separately. There are some good die sets out there that seat and crimp in the same stroke but the adjustment can be a challenge for a new reloader. The reason I say this is applying a taper crimp is a bit tricky. Too much will crush a bullet and too little will allow the bullet to migrate. I do all of my taper crimping with an adjustable crimp die after I seat the bullet. I use a Lee Factory Crimp die but there are other good crimp dies out there. A good test for proper crimp is to try to push the bullet into the case on a hard surface like your reloading bench. Also use your barrel as a gauge and drop test your ammo. I use a Wilson case gauge but your barrel works. If they won't drop your cases are too fat probably due to a sizing die not adjusted properly or worn out brass.

I also use coated or FMJ bullets to avoid leading. A bullet that is slightly too small for your barrel will cause leading. Once that starts it sucks hugely.

Just more stuff to know about but it isn't that hard.

https://youtu.be/h1LEbcRDs70

daved20319
11-15-2020, 09:47 AM
I load for both 9mm and .45 ACP, I use coated lead in the .45's and jacketed in the 9mm, but I'm loading full or nearly full power loads to be similar to my carry/SD ammo. Nothing particularly tricky about loading for pistols, although I don't crimp as such, just enough to iron out the case mouth bell. I also use my gun barrels as case gauges, a bullet profile or seating length that works in one gun may not in another. CZ's are notorious for having short chambers, Glocks are at the other end of the spectrum. Also, some profiles may work in the gun's chamber, but not in the mag, my Sig can be troublesome with certain truncated cone bullets because of the magazines. If you do stay with lead bullets, Lyman makes a series of small reloading booklets that include load data for a small number of similar load types. They have one for popular pistol calibers, and it includes data for lead bullets. Might be worth picking one up. Good luck, and enjoy!

Dave

JM Campbell
11-15-2020, 10:06 AM
So, lead does not work well with a semi auto? I am not set on a bullet, I am just trying to find the easiest/best way to reload one practice loads.

The uncoated lead projectiles will lead up your barrel faster and will have to be cleaned more often, lead exposure while loading is another concern. Nitrile gloves should be worn while processing exposed lead and cases while doing prep work. Some ranges depending on your area/local/state laws do not allow exposed lead projectiles. I prefer the coated lead projectiles.


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revchuck38
11-15-2020, 10:21 AM
So, lead does not work well with a semi auto? I am not set on a bullet, I am just trying to find the easiest/best way to reload one practice loads.

Lead can work well in a semi-auto. There are three types of lead bullets - swaged, cast and lubricated, and cast and coated. Swaged bullets don't work well in autoloaders though they can be excellent in revolvers. Cast and lubed bullets can work well in autoloaders but must be the correct size; if they're too small, they'll lead. A good diameter to start out with is .356. Coated cast bullets are the best option since they're most resistant to leading, but again must be correctly sized for best accuracy. Coated bullets are a lot less messy to deal with too.

Note that there's a limit on how light you can go with your loads in an autoloader since you need a certain amount of recoil to function the pistol. Starting loads in reloading manuals will usually function, but you have to try them to verify it.

Borderland
11-15-2020, 10:53 AM
So, lead does not work well with a semi auto? I am not set on a bullet, I am just trying to find the easiest/best way to reload one practice loads.

Lead does work but I would suggest you match the bullet dia to your barrel to avoid leading. For instance, I used .452 dia lead in all of my Colt 1911's. Never had a problem with leading. I did however have a leading problem with .452 dia in a Sig P-220. So it depends on the bore dia. and the bullet. A bullet manufacture may say their bullets are .452 but may be .4515. Those bullets will lead some barrels. Coated bullets solves all of those problems. I decided that uncoated lead wasn't worth the hassle and gave away all of my uncoated bullets. I now use coated or FMJ exclusively. No more leading and no more lead exposure. Your call.