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View Full Version : ETS clear Glock magazines



Glenn E. Meyer
01-27-2015, 02:54 PM
Anybody - see or not the new transparent Glock mags by ETS?

That's kind of fun if they run.

JSGlock34
01-31-2015, 08:43 PM
Cool design. I wonder how rugged they are.

ETS Transparent Glock Magazine (http://www.etsgroup.us/ETS-Group-Glock-Magazines-s/1823.htm)

http://www.etsgroup.us/v/tn_With%20Ammo%202.jpg
http://www.etsgroup.us/v/tn_With%20Ammo%201.jpg
http://www.etsgroup.us/v/tn_3%20Mags%20Profile.jpg

GJM
01-31-2015, 09:03 PM
Seeing that clear magazine is like seeing sausage made -- think I prefer black!

olstyn
02-01-2015, 03:07 AM
I guess that makes it easy to be sure you've loaded the correct number of rounds in the mag, and there's always a market for things that look cool.

Chuck Haggard
02-01-2015, 10:12 AM
If they can get those to work better than clear ARs mags.

I've not noted that polycarb is a great material for making magazines out of.

JV_
02-01-2015, 10:17 AM
It's interesting to see just how compressed the mag spring is when the mag is fully loaded.

olstyn
02-01-2015, 10:56 AM
If they can get those to work better than clear ARs mags.

I've not noted that polycarb is a great material for making magazines out of.

I'm not an engineer or a materials scientist, but just looking at the dimensions of Glock mags vs AR mags, it seems to me that AR mags would be more prone to flexing than Glock mags. Given that, it's probably possible to get away with a less stiff material for the Glock mags. I'm not going to predict that they'll be 100% awesome, but I imagine they'll have less issues.

Chuck Haggard
02-01-2015, 11:04 AM
I'm not an engineer or a materials scientist, but just looking at the dimensions of Glock mags vs AR mags, it seems to me that AR mags would be more prone to flexing than Glock mags. Given that, it's probably possible to get away with a less stiff material for the Glock mags. I'm not going to predict that they'll be 100% awesome, but I imagine they'll have less issues.

The feedlips are what have issues, with cracking and such, not much room to make the feedlips on a Glock much thicker. This is why all of the polycarb AR mags that I have seen that work have metal reinforced feedlips.

olstyn
02-01-2015, 11:22 AM
Fair enough; I was thinking in terms of the mag body flexing and possibly causing binding/jams as a result.

ETSgroup
02-02-2015, 10:29 AM
Fair enough; I was thinking in terms of the mag body flexing and possibly causing binding/jams as a result.

Hello Everyone,
We saw some traffic to our website from this forum so I decided to come and see if there were any questions I could answer about our upcoming glock mags.

I know many of you are probably not familiar with our new AR 15 mags yet, so I wanted to tell you a little bit about our proprietary polymer. Before I dive into that, I did want to add to this conversation that the feedlips on our glock mag will be thicker than our AR15 mag. Even though there is a lot of spring tension in these little glock mags, when you consider that our material will easily hold 30 rounds in the AR mag with only 1 feedlip holding that tension. The glock mags holding the rounds in and feeding them reliably won't be a problem with both feelips.

That said, let me get a little technical about our new material.

When we set out to make our AR mags there were several important factors to consider to get the material right. We needed a material with enough tensile strength to hold it's shape and keep the rounds in when fully loaded. We also needed a material that would not creep badly so when guys store the mags fully loaded for long periods the feedlips won't spread.

Once we established a parameter for what we needed as far as rigidity of the material, we then turned to impact strength. We wanted our mags to be able to survive a 6ft drop, fully loaded, on the feelips on concrete. We far surpassed our goal there, our mags can easily survive a 20ft drop on concrete on the feedlips. Our mags can also survive an 8000lb vehicle running over it, and even stopping with the tire on the mag, while empty, with no damage.

Another extremely important factor when dealing with plastics is thermal stability. Meaning, how will it perform in extreme cold or hot. We tested our material down to -60, and at that temp it survivded the 6ft drop on concrete with no problems. We also left it at 200F for 7 days fully loaded to make sure it would not get soft and spit rounds out. Our plastic does not melt until over 700F, so heat was not an issue.

Then, after all of that, we had to look at chemical resistance. Our plastic was submerged in all of the transportational fluids, several acids, and many other chemicals for a week straight. In all of these chemicals, our material retained over 99% of its mechanical properties and was virtually unaffected. This also included 99.9% pure DEET, which many know is particularly nasty on clear plastics. Also, we added UV stabilizers so the sun will not break down our material and make it brittle over time.

All in all, we spent over a year developing and getting our material to get it just right. All of this hard work shows in our AR mags. They represent a new level of overall toughness and durability in plastic mags.

We are very excited to bring all of this technology to our Glock mags. And we think your expectations are going to be far exceeded by our mags.

If you guys have any specific questions I will answer as best I can without giving out any proprietary information.

We truly welcome questions like these because it give us a chance to let everyone know what sets us apart from the rest.

Thanks for your time.

JCS
02-02-2015, 12:43 PM
Hello Everyone,
We saw some traffic to our website from this forum so I decided to come and see if there were any questions I could answer about our upcoming glock mags.

I know many of you are probably not familiar with our new AR 15 mags yet, so I wanted to tell you a little bit about our proprietary polymer. Before I dive into that, I did want to add to this conversation that the feedlips on our glock mag will be thicker than our AR15 mag. Even though there is a lot of spring tension in these little glock mags, when you consider that our material will easily hold 30 rounds in the AR mag with only 1 feedlip holding that tension. The glock mags holding the rounds in and feeding them reliably won't be a problem with both feelips.

That said, let me get a little technical about our new material.

When we set out to make our AR mags there were several important factors to consider to get the material right. We needed a material with enough tensile strength to hold it's shape and keep the rounds in when fully loaded. We also needed a material that would not creep badly so when guys store the mags fully loaded for long periods the feedlips won't spread.

Once we established a parameter for what we needed as far as rigidity of the material, we then turned to impact strength. We wanted our mags to be able to survive a 6ft drop, fully loaded, on the feelips on concrete. We far surpassed our goal there, our mags can easily survive a 20ft drop on concrete on the feedlips. Our mags can also survive an 8000lb vehicle running over it, and even stopping with the tire on the mag, while empty, with no damage.

Another extremely important factor when dealing with plastics is thermal stability. Meaning, how will it perform in extreme cold or hot. We tested our material down to -60, and at that temp it survivded the 6ft drop on concrete with no problems. We also left it at 200F for 7 days fully loaded to make sure it would not get soft and spit rounds out. Our plastic does not melt until over 700F, so heat was not an issue.

Then, after all of that, we had to look at chemical resistance. Our plastic was submerged in all of the transportational fluids, several acids, and many other chemicals for a week straight. In all of these chemicals, our material retained over 99% of its mechanical properties and was virtually unaffected. This also included 99.9% pure DEET, which many know is particularly nasty on clear plastics. Also, we added UV stabilizers so the sun will not break down our material and make it brittle over time.

All in all, we spent over a year developing and getting our material to get it just right. All of this hard work shows in our AR mags. They represent a new level of overall toughness and durability in plastic mags.

We are very excited to bring all of this technology to our Glock mags. And we think your expectations are going to be far exceeded by our mags.

If you guys have any specific questions I will answer as best I can without giving out any proprietary information.

We truly welcome questions like these because it give us a chance to let everyone know what sets us apart from the rest.

Thanks for your time.

What is the weight of an empty mag? I'm on board I just have worries if there will be issues with an empty mag dropping free. Thanks for the info on the material! I'll be ordering as soon as I can.

LittleLebowski
02-02-2015, 12:49 PM
Hello Everyone,
We saw some traffic to our website from this forum so I decided to come and see if there were any questions I could answer about our upcoming glock mags.

I know many of you are probably not familiar with our new AR 15 mags yet, so I wanted to tell you a little bit about our proprietary polymer. Before I dive into that, I did want to add to this conversation that the feedlips on our glock mag will be thicker than our AR15 mag. Even though there is a lot of spring tension in these little glock mags, when you consider that our material will easily hold 30 rounds in the AR mag with only 1 feedlip holding that tension. The glock mags holding the rounds in and feeding them reliably won't be a problem with both feelips.

That said, let me get a little technical about our new material.

When we set out to make our AR mags there were several important factors to consider to get the material right. We needed a material with enough tensile strength to hold it's shape and keep the rounds in when fully loaded. We also needed a material that would not creep badly so when guys store the mags fully loaded for long periods the feedlips won't spread.

Once we established a parameter for what we needed as far as rigidity of the material, we then turned to impact strength. We wanted our mags to be able to survive a 6ft drop, fully loaded, on the feelips on concrete. We far surpassed our goal there, our mags can easily survive a 20ft drop on concrete on the feedlips. Our mags can also survive an 8000lb vehicle running over it, and even stopping with the tire on the mag, while empty, with no damage.

Another extremely important factor when dealing with plastics is thermal stability. Meaning, how will it perform in extreme cold or hot. We tested our material down to -60, and at that temp it survivded the 6ft drop on concrete with no problems. We also left it at 200F for 7 days fully loaded to make sure it would not get soft and spit rounds out. Our plastic does not melt until over 700F, so heat was not an issue.

Then, after all of that, we had to look at chemical resistance. Our plastic was submerged in all of the transportational fluids, several acids, and many other chemicals for a week straight. In all of these chemicals, our material retained over 99% of its mechanical properties and was virtually unaffected. This also included 99.9% pure DEET, which many know is particularly nasty on clear plastics. Also, we added UV stabilizers so the sun will not break down our material and make it brittle over time.

All in all, we spent over a year developing and getting our material to get it just right. All of this hard work shows in our AR mags. They represent a new level of overall toughness and durability in plastic mags.

We are very excited to bring all of this technology to our Glock mags. And we think your expectations are going to be far exceeded by our mags.

If you guys have any specific questions I will answer as best I can without giving out any proprietary information.

We truly welcome questions like these because it give us a chance to let everyone know what sets us apart from the rest.

Thanks for your time.

Looking forward to trying a couple of these out.

ETSgroup
02-02-2015, 01:43 PM
What is the weight of an empty mag? I'm on board I just have worries if there will be issues with an empty mag dropping free. Thanks for the info on the material! I'll be ordering as soon as I can.

Good question, we haven't weighed them yet, but they are significantly lighter than a glock mag since there is no steel lining. That said, these mags will drop free empty or loaded. We know that is important to the end user. We haven't had any issues thus far with any prototypes not dropping free.

Kyle Reese
02-02-2015, 02:04 PM
Looking forward to trying a couple of these out.
Ditto.

ffhounddog
02-02-2015, 02:16 PM
I am down for a few Glock 19 mags.

What kind of spring are you using OEM weight or a little strong like the Wolff mag springs?

ETSgroup
02-02-2015, 07:31 PM
I am down for a few Glock 19 mags.

What kind of spring are you using OEM weight or a little strong like the Wolff mag springs?

The springs will be exactly like OEM